Overview

Comprehensive Description

Anthomyiidae (Anthomyiid Flies, Dung Flies)
The adults are generally greyish with black dots, resembling the Muscid flies. They occasionally feed at flowers with exposed nectaries, such as members of the Carrot family. The larvae have various habits, sometimes feeding on dung, scavenging in bird nests, and other rotting materials. The larvae of some species feed on bulbs, and can become pests of onions and lilies.

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Ecology

Associations

Known prey organisms

Anthomyiidae (anthomyiid fly) preys on:
fungi

Based on studies in:
Tibet (Montane)

This list may not be complete but is based on published studies.
  • L. W. Swan, The ecology of the high Himalayas, Sci. Am. 205:68-78, from pp. 76-77 (October 1961).
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Known predators

Anthomyiidae (anthomyiid fly) is prey of:
Salticidae

Based on studies in:
Tibet (Montane)

This list may not be complete but is based on published studies.
  • L. W. Swan, The ecology of the high Himalayas, Sci. Am. 205:68-78, from pp. 76-77 (October 1961).
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© SPIRE project

Source: SPIRE

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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD) Stats
                                        
Specimen Records:18,053Public Records:2,228
Specimens with Sequences:17,850Public Species:30
Specimens with Barcodes:17,735Public BINs:72
Species:199         
Species With Barcodes:185         
          
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Barcode data

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Locations of barcode samples

Collection Sites: world map showing specimen collection locations for Anthomyiidae

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Wikipedia

Anthomyiidae

Anthomyiidae is a large and diverse family of Muscoidea flies. Most look rather like small houseflies, but are commonly drab grey. The genus Anthomyia, in contrast, are generally conspicuously-patterned in black-and-white or black-and-silvery-grey. Most are difficult to identify, apart from a few groups such as the kelp flies that are conspicuous on beaches.

The name Anthomyiidae was derived from Greek "anthos" (flower) plus "myia" (a fly). Some species are commonly called "root-maggots", as the larvae are found in the stems and roots of various plants. As larvae, some also feed on decaying plant material. The well-known grey "seaweed flies" or "kelp flies" (Fucellia) are examples.[1] Others are scavengers in such places as birds' nests; yet other species are leaf miners; the family also includes inquilines, commensals, and parasitic larvae.

Some species in the family are significant agricultural pests, particularly some from the genus Delia, which includes the onion fly (Delia antiqua), the wheat bulb fly (Delia coarctata), the turnip root fly (Delia floralis), the bean seed fly (Delia platura) and the cabbage root fly (Delia radicum).

Description[edit]

For terms see Morphology of Diptera. Body small or moderate in size. Hypopleural bristles on sides of thorax apical. Anal vein of wing reaching the margin of the wings (except in Chelisia Rd). Median vein straight, not curved towards anterior alar margin. Three pairs of postsutural dorsocentral bristles almost always present.First segment of posteror tarsi on lower side near base with minute bristes. Sternopleuron lower side often with short soft hairs. Eyes in male in most cases close-set or contiguous. Females of many species not known to date.


Classification[edit]

Identification[edit]

  • Ackland, D. M. 2001. Revision of afrotropical Anthomyia Meigen, 1803 (Diptera: Anthomyiidae), with descriptions of ten new species. African Invertebrates 42: 1-94. [1]
  • Ackland, D. M. 2008. Revision of Afrotropical Delia Robineau-Desvoidy, 1830 (Diptera: Anthomyiidae), with descriptions of six new species. African Invertebrates 49 (1): 1-75. [2]
  • K. Yu. Elberg Family Anthomyiidae in Bei-Bienko, G. Ya, 1988 Keys to the insects of the European Part of the USSR Volume 5 (Diptera) Part 2 English edition
  • Emden, F. I. Van (1941): Keys to the Muscidae of the Ethiopian Region :Scatophaginae, Anthomyiinae, Lispinae, Fanniinae. Bull. Ent.Res., 1941–1942, 32: 251-275. Keys to Afrotropical genera and species. See Pont & Ackland in Crosskey, R. W. et al. 1980 for updated classification and nomenclature.
  • Hennig, W., 1966-1976. 63a. Anthomyiidae. In: Die Fliegen der paläarktischen Region 7(1) (Erwin Lindner, ed.): 1-974, pl. 1-78. E. Schweizerbart, Stuttgart. Monograph of Palaearctic species.
  • Hucket, H. C. (1965): The Muscidae of Northern Canada, Alaska and Greenland (Diptera). Mem. Ent. Soc. Canada, 42: 1-369. Keys, illustrations.
  • Huckett H. C. (1971): The Anthomyiidae of California exclusive of. the subfamily Scatophaginae (Diptera). Bull. Calif. Insect Survey. 12: 1-121. Illustrated Keys. South Nearctic and North Neotropical.
  • Pont, A.C., 1972, Family Muscidae. In: A Catalogue of the Diptera of the Americas South of the United States, 97, 111 p. Museu de Zoologia, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo.
  • Suwa, M. (1974): Anthomyiidae of Japan (Diptera). Insecta Matsumurana New Series 4 : 1-247. Comprehensive revision. Excellent illustrations.
  • Suwa, M., & B. Darvas (1998): Family Anthomyiidae. In: Contributions to a manual of Palaearctic Diptera Volume 3 (L. Papp & B. Darvas, eds.): 571-616. Science Herald, Budapest.

Species lists[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Alan Weaving; Mike Picker; Griffiths, Charles Llewellyn (2003). Field Guide to Insects of South Africa. New Holland Publishers, Ltd. ISBN 1-86872-713-0. 
  • Genera - Suwa, M., & B. Darvas, 1998. Family Anthomyiidae. In: Contributions to a manual of Palaearctic Diptera Volume 3 (L. Papp & B. Darvas, eds.): 571-616. Science Herald, Budapest.
  • Species - Hennig, W., 1966-1976. 63a. Anthomyiidae. In: Die Fliegen der paläarktischen Region 7(1) (Erwin Lindner, ed.): 1-974, pl. 1-78. E. Schweizerbart, Stuttgart.

See also[edit]

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