Overview

Distribution

Distribution: all temperate and tropical seas. Head bony and casquelike. Pectoral fin with lower 2 or 3 rays enlarged for food detection. Dorsal fins separate. Benthic. Good sound producers. Attains 1 m maximum length.
  • MASDEA (1997).
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Source: World Register of Marine Species

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Ecology

Associations

Known predators

Triglidae (Sea Robins) is prey of:
Pollachius pollachius
Urophycis tenuis
Urophycis chuss
Gadidae
Hemitripterus americanus
Scophthalmus aquosus
Paralichthys dentatus
Mustelus canis
Squalus acanthias
Lophius americanus
Cynoscion
Pomatomus saltatrix
Chondrichthyes

Based on studies in:
USA, Northeastern US contintental shelf (Coastal)

This list may not be complete but is based on published studies.
  • Link J (2002) Does food web theory work for marine ecosystems? Mar Ecol Prog Ser 230:1–9
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Source: SPIRE

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Known prey organisms

Triglidae (Sea Robins) preys on:
Crangon
Mysidae
Pandalidae
Decapoda
Gammaridae
Hyperiidae
Caprellidae
Isopoda
Cumacea
Cancer
Brachyura
Polychaeta
Bivalvia

Based on studies in:
USA, Northeastern US contintental shelf (Coastal)

This list may not be complete but is based on published studies.
  • Link J (2002) Does food web theory work for marine ecosystems? Mar Ecol Prog Ser 230:1–9
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© SPIRE project

Source: SPIRE

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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD) Stats
                                        
Specimen Records:863Public Records:264
Specimens with Sequences:686Public Species:29
Specimens with Barcodes:650Public BINs:28
Species:68         
Species With Barcodes:60         
          
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Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

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Barcode data

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© Barcode of Life Data Systems

Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

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Locations of barcode samples

Collection Sites: world map showing specimen collection locations for Triglidae

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Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

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Wikipedia

Sea robin

For the naval UAV launch system, see Sea Robin XFC.

Sea robins, also known as gurnard, are bottom-feeding scorpaeniform fish in the family Triglidae. They get their name from their large pectoral fins, which, when swimming, open and close like a bird's wings in flight.

They are bottom-dwelling fish, living at depths to 200 m (660 ft). Most species are around 30 to 40 cm (12 to 16 in) in length. They have an unusually solid skull, and many species also possess armored plates on their bodies. Another distinctive feature is the presence of a "drumming muscle" that makes sounds by beating against the swim bladder.[2] When caught, they make a croaking noise similar to a frog, which has given them the onomatopoeic name gurnard.[3]

Sea robins have six spiny "legs", three on each side. These legs are actually flexible spines that were once part of the pectoral fin. Over time, the spines separated themselves from the rest of the fin, developing into feeler-like "forelegs". The pectoral fins have been thought to let the fish "walk" on the bottom, but are really used to stir up food.[citation needed] The first three rays of the pectoral fins are membrane-free and used for chemoreception.[citation needed]

As food[edit]

Sea robin flesh is described as firm and tender when cooked. The fish serves as an adequate replacement to rascasse, or scorpionfish, in bouillabaisse.[citation needed]

Angling[edit]

Sea robins can be caught by dropping a variety of baits and lures to the seafloor, where they actively feed. Mackerel is believed to be the most efficient bait for catching sea robins, but bunker and other fish meat can also be used successfully depending on location. Sea robins can also be caught by lure fishing if lured near the substrate. They are often considered to be rough fish, caught when fishing for more desirable fish such as striped bass.[citation needed]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Froese, Rainer, and Daniel Pauly, eds. (2012). "Triglidae" in FishBase. December 2012 version.
  2. ^ Eschmeyer, William N. (1998). Paxton, J.R. & Eschmeyer, W.N., ed. Encyclopedia of Fish. San Diego: Academic Press. pp. 176–177. ISBN 0-12-547665-5. 
  3. ^ "Gurnard". Merriam-Webster Online. Retrieved 18 June 2012. 
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