Overview

Distribution

depth in m: 0 - 300; horizontal distribution: Antarctic circumpolar neritic
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© WoRMS for SMEBD

Source: World Register of Marine Species

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Ecology

Habitat

Depth range based on 159 specimens in 1 taxon.
Water temperature and chemistry ranges based on 132 samples.

Environmental ranges
  Depth range (m): 0 - 800
  Temperature range (°C): -1.901 - 2.290
  Nitrate (umol/L): 21.839 - 35.828
  Salinity (PPS): 33.401 - 34.719
  Oxygen (ml/l): 3.766 - 8.072
  Phosphate (umol/l): 1.189 - 2.480
  Silicate (umol/l): 21.227 - 110.733

Graphical representation

Depth range (m): 0 - 800

Temperature range (°C): -1.901 - 2.290

Nitrate (umol/L): 21.839 - 35.828

Salinity (PPS): 33.401 - 34.719

Oxygen (ml/l): 3.766 - 8.072

Phosphate (umol/l): 1.189 - 2.480

Silicate (umol/l): 21.227 - 110.733
 
Note: this information has not been validated. Check this *note*. Your feedback is most welcome.

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Associations

Known predators

  • G. A. Knox, Antarctic marine ecosystems. In: Antarctic Ecology, M. W. Holdgate, Ed. (Academic Press, New York, 1970) 1:69-96, from p. 87.
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© SPIRE project

Source: SPIRE

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Known prey organisms

Euphausia crystallorophias (Euphausia superba, E. crystallorophias) preys on:
microalgae

Based on studies in:
Antarctic (Estuarine)

This list may not be complete but is based on published studies.
  • G. A. Knox, Antarctic marine ecosystems. In: Antarctic Ecology, M. W. Holdgate, Ed. (Academic Press, New York, 1970) 1:69-96, from p. 87.
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© SPIRE project

Source: SPIRE

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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Barcode data: Euphausia crystallorophias

The following is a representative barcode sequence, the centroid of all available sequences for this species.


There are 48 barcode sequences available from BOLD and GenBank.

Below is a sequence of the barcode region Cytochrome oxidase subunit 1 (COI or COX1) from a member of the species.

See the BOLD taxonomy browser for more complete information about this specimen and other sequences.

ACTTCATTA---AGACTGATTATCCGAGCTGAGTTAGGACAACCAGGAAGTCTAATTGGGGAC---GACCAGATTTACAACGTTGTAGTTACAGCACATGCTTTTGTTATAATCTTCTTCATGGTAATACCAATTATAATCGGTGGTTTTGGAAACTGATTAGTTCCTCTAATG---TTGGGAGCCCCTGATATGGCATTCCCTCGGATAAACAACATGAGGTTTTGGTTACTGCCTCCTTCCTTAACTCTTTTACTAGGAAGAGGTCTAGTAGAAAGT---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------GGG---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------GTA
-- end --

Download FASTA File

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© Barcode of Life Data Systems

Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

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Statistics of barcoding coverage: Euphausia crystallorophias

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 25
Specimens with Barcodes: 31
Species With Barcodes: 1
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© Barcode of Life Data Systems

Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

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Genomic DNA is available from 2 specimens with morphological vouchers housed at Research Collection of Slava Ivanenko
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© Ocean Genome Legacy

Source: Ocean Genome Resource

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Wikipedia

Euphausia crystallorophias

Euphausia crystallorophias is a species of krill, sometimes called ice krill,[1] crystal krill,[2] or Antarctic coastal krill.[2] It lives in the coastal waters around Antarctica, further south than any other species of krill.[2] The specimens for the species' original description were collected through holes cut in the ice by Robert Falcon Scott's Discovery Expedition,[1] several thousand having been donated by Thomas Vere Hodgson.[3]

Description[edit]

Adults of Euphausia crystallorophias are smaller than those of Euphausia superba, reaching a length of 23–35 millimetres (0.91–1.38 in); they can be distinguished from young E. superba by the large size of the eyes, and by the long, sharply-pointed rostrum.[4]

Distribution[edit]

E. crystallorophias is found around the coasts of Antarctica, replacing the more oceanic Euphausia superba at latitudes above 74° south.[5] It is usually found at depths of up to 350–600 metres (1,150–1,970 ft), but has occasionally been found as deep as 4,000 metres (13,000 ft).[1]

Ecology[edit]

E. crystallorophias feeds on bacteria, diatoms, detritus and other microorganisms, including the algae that form on the underside of sea ice, and is in turn an important food source for fish, whales and penguins,[2] especially minke whales, Weddell seals, Adelie penguins, and the Antarctic silverfish.[1] This makes it arguably the most important link in the coastal Antarctic food chain between the primary producers and the macrofauna.[2] Unlike most other krill species, the eggs of E. crystallorophias are neutrally buoyant, meaning that the eggs do not sink, and the hatchling larvae do not have to swim back to the more productive, shallower waters; however, since this means both life stages inhabit the same depths, it is not known how the larvae avoid being eaten by the adults.[6]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d Peter Bruggeman. "Ice krill Euphausia crystallorophias". Underwater Field Guide to Ross Island & McMurdo Sound, Antarctica. 
  2. ^ a b c d e S. N. Jarman, N. G. Elliott, S. Nicol & A McMinn (2002). "Genetic differentiation in the Antarctic coastal krill Euphausia crystallorophias". Heredity 88 (4): 280–287. doi:10.1038/sj.hdy.6800041. PMID 11920136. 
  3. ^ E. W. L. Holt & W. M. Tattersall (1906). "Preliminary Notice of the Schizopoda collected by H. M. S. 'Discovery' in the Antarctic Region". The Annals and Magazine of Natural History, 7th series 17 (97): 1–11. doi:10.1080/00222930608562484. 
  4. ^ "Euphausia crystallorophias". Euphausiids of the World Ocean. Marine Species Identification Portal. Retrieved January 12, 2010. 
  5. ^ Antonello Sala, Massimo Azzali & Aniello Russo (2002). "Krill of the Ross Sea: distribution, abundance and demography of Euphausia superba and Euphausia crystallorophias during the Italian Antarctic Expedition (January–February 2000)". Scientia Marina 66 (2): 123–133. doi:10.3989/scimar.2002.66n2123. 
  6. ^ Susan A. Harrington & P. G. Thomas (1987). "Observations on spawning by Euphausia crystallorophias from waters adjacent to Enderby Land (East Antarctica) and speculations on the early ontogenetic ecology of neritic euphausiids". Polar Biology 7 (2): 93–95. doi:10.1007/BF00570446. 
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