Overview

Comprehensive Description

General comments

This information is based an ongoing project dedicated to the inventory and dissemination of information on lepidopteran larvae, their host plants, and their parasitoids in a Costa Rican tropical wet forest and an Ecuadorian montane cloud forest.


N=7 rearings as of 2012, 3 eclosed, 3 were parasitized and 1 died.

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Distribution

occurs (regularly, as a native taxon) in multiple nations

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National Distribution

United States

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

Type of Residency: Year-round

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Collected in Heredia Province, Costa Rica.

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Ecology

Associations

Foodplant Associations

Bignoniaceae: Mussatia sp.

Fabaceae: Cassia sp.

Costaceae: Costus malortieanus

Solonaceae: Solanum sp.

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Parasitoid Associations

Tachinidae: Leptostylum sp. (N=2).

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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Barcode data: Manduca florestan

The following is a representative barcode sequence, the centroid of all available sequences for this species.


There are 79 barcode sequences available from BOLD and GenBank.

Below is a sequence of the barcode region Cytochrome oxidase subunit 1 (COI or COX1) from a member of the species.

See the BOLD taxonomy browser for more complete information about this specimen and other sequences.

NNAACATTATATTTTATTTTTGGAATTTGAGCAGGAATATTAGGAACTTCTTTAAGATTATTAATTCGAGCAGAATTAGGTAATCCAGGATCTTTAATTGGAGATGATCAAATTTATAATACAATTGTTACAGCTCATGCATTTATTATAATTTTTTTTATAGTAATACCTATTATAATTGGAGGATTTGGAAATTGATTAGTACCTTTAATATTAGGCGCCCCTGATATAGCCTTTCCTCGAATAAATAATATAAGATTTTGGCTTCTTCCCCCTTCTTTAATATTACTAATTTCTAGTAGTATTGTAGAAAATGGAGCCGGAACAGGATGAACAGTATACCCCCCTTTATCTTCTAATATTGCTCATAGAGGAAGATCCGTTGATTTAGCTATTTTTTCTTTACATTTAGCAGGTATTTCATCTATTTTAGGAGCAATTAATTTTATTACAACAATTATTAATATACGAATTAATAATATATTATTTGATCAAATACCATTATTTGTATGAGCTGTTGGTATTACAGCATTTTTATTACTATTATCTTTACCTGTTTTAGCGGGTGCAATTACTATATTATTAACAGATCGAAATTTAAATACATCATTTTTTGACCCTGCTGGANNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNN
-- end --

Download FASTA File

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Statistics of barcoding coverage: Manduca florestan

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 45
Specimens with Barcodes: 163
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Conservation

Conservation Status

National NatureServe Conservation Status

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: NNR - Unranked

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NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: G4 - Apparently Secure

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Wikipedia

Manduca florestan

The Florestan Sphinx (Manduca florestan) is a moth of the Sphingidae family. It is found from the mountains of southern Arizona, New Mexico, and the lower Rio Grande Valley of southern Texas through Mexico, Belize, Guatemala, Nicaragua, Costa Rica and the rest of Central America south into South America at least to Paraguay, Bolivia, Venezuela, Argentina, Brazil and Surinam.[2]

The wingspan is 99–110 mm. It is similar in appearance to several other members of the Manduca genus, but a number of differences distinguish it from Manduca lichenea, to which it most closely compares. There is a great deal of individual variation. The forewings have a greenish tint and prominent black discal streaks.

There is one generation with adults on wing from late June to early August in the United States. In Bolivia, adults have been reported in March and again from October to December, while adults are on wing year round in Costa Rica. They feed on the nectar of various flowers, including Plumeria rubra in Costa Rica.

The larvae feed on Tecoma and Citharexylum species, Stachytarpheta frantzii, Callicarpa acuminata, Aegiphylla martinicensis, Citharexylum costaricensis, Tabebuia ochracea, Callichlamys latifolia, Cydista heterophylla, Cydista diversifolia, Crescentia alata, Macfadyena unguis-cati, Cordia panamensis, Cordia alliodora and Chionentis panamensis. In Brazil, larvae have been reported on Lantana camara, Pyrostegia venusta and Vitex megapotamica.

References[edit]

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