Overview

Distribution

Indian Ocean and western Pacific from Japan to Australia. Anguilliform. Caudal pointed or bluntly rounded. Barbels usually 4 pairs. Adipose fin absent. Caudal fin rays may be far advanced along dorsal. Lower procurrent caudal rays confluent with long anal fin. Branchiostegal rays 7-14. Some can cause painful injury. Marine species = ISSCAAP 39; freshwater species = ISSCAAP 13.
  • MASDEA (1997).
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Source: World Register of Marine Species

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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD) Stats
                                        
Specimen Records:110Public Records:38
Specimens with Sequences:96Public Species:7
Specimens with Barcodes:94Public BINs:12
Species:13         
Species With Barcodes:11         
          
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Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

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Barcode data

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Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

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Locations of barcode samples

Collection Sites: world map showing specimen collection locations for Plotosidae

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Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

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Wikipedia

Eeltail catfish

Striped eel catfish, Plotosus lineatus

The eeltail catfish are a family (Plotosidae) of catfish whose tails are elongated in an eel-like fashion. These catfishes are native to the Indian Ocean and western Pacific from Japan to Australia and Fiji.[1] The family includes about 35 species in 10 genera.[1][2] About half of the species are freshwater, occurring in Australia and New Guinea.[1]

These fish have eel-like bodies. Their tails are pointed or bluntly rounded. Most species have four pairs of barbels. The adipose fin is absent. The tail fin is formed by the joining of the second dorsal fin, the caudal fin, and the anal fin, forming a single, continuous fin.[1]

Some of these catfishes can inflict painful wounds; stings from Plotosus lineatus may result in death.[1] They are bottom feeders and use the barbels around their mouths to detect food.[3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e Nelson, Joseph S. (2006). Fishes of the World. John Wiley & Sons, Inc. ISBN 0-471-25031-7. 
  2. ^ Ferraris, Carl J., Jr. (2007). "Checklist of catfishes, recent and fossil (Osteichthyes: Siluriformes), and catalogue of siluriform primary types" (PDF). Zootaxa 1418: 1–628. Retrieved 2009-06-23. 
  3. ^ Froese, Rainer, and Daniel Pauly, eds. (2007). "Plotosidae" in FishBase. Aug 2007 version.
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