Physical Description

Diagnostic Description

Description

Benthic, in deepwaters. Distribution: tropical and subtropical western Atlantic and Indo-Pacific. Rounded to truncate caudal fin. Rays in dorsal fin 12-18. Anal fin with 11-16 rays.
  • MASDEA (1997).
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Source: World Register of Marine Species

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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD) Stats
                                        
Specimen Records:67Public Records:8
Specimens with Sequences:53Public Species:3
Specimens with Barcodes:53Public BINs:2
Species:16         
Species With Barcodes:16         
          
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Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

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Barcode data

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© Barcode of Life Data Systems

Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

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Locations of barcode samples

Collection Sites: world map showing specimen collection locations for Triacanthodidae

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Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

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Wikipedia

Spikefish

The spikefishes (family Triacanthodidae) are ray-finned fishes related to the pufferfishes and triggerfishes. They live in deep waters, below 50 metres (160 ft), but above the continental shelves. They are found in the Atlantic, Indian Ocean, and the west-central Pacific.[1]

The spikefishes are quite variable in form, with some species having tubular snouts (greatly elongated in Halimochirurgus and Macrorhamphosodes), and others have spoon-like teeth for scraping the scales off other fishes. Depending on the exact species involved, they reach a maximum length of about 5–22 centimetres (2.0–8.7 in).

References[edit]

  1. ^ Matsura, Keiichi & Tyler, James C. (1998). Paxton, J.R. & Eschmeyer, W.N., ed. Encyclopedia of Fishes. San Diego: Academic Press. pp. 227–228. ISBN 0-12-547665-5. 
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Source: Wikipedia

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