Ecology

Habitat

Depth range based on 147 specimens in 7 taxa.
Water temperature and chemistry ranges based on 87 samples.

Environmental ranges
  Depth range (m): 0 - 1795
  Temperature range (°C): 3.616 - 14.162
  Nitrate (umol/L): 6.526 - 30.354
  Salinity (PPS): 32.618 - 35.977
  Oxygen (ml/l): 3.183 - 6.394
  Phosphate (umol/l): 0.624 - 1.920
  Silicate (umol/l): 3.916 - 24.399

Graphical representation

Depth range (m): 0 - 1795

Temperature range (°C): 3.616 - 14.162

Nitrate (umol/L): 6.526 - 30.354

Salinity (PPS): 32.618 - 35.977

Oxygen (ml/l): 3.183 - 6.394

Phosphate (umol/l): 0.624 - 1.920

Silicate (umol/l): 3.916 - 24.399
 
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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD) Stats
Specimen Records: 35
Specimens with Sequences: 19
Specimens with Barcodes: 18
Species: 3
Species With Barcodes: 2
Public Records: 3
Public Species: 2
Public BINs: 3
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Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

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Barcode data

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Wikipedia

Dentalium (genus)


Dentalium is a genus of tooth shells or tusk shells, marine scaphopod molluscs in the family Dentaliidae.[1]

Contents

Human use

Native Americans

The shells of Dentalium neohexagonum are known to have been used by the Chumash people at least as early as circa 1000 AD, in the Morro Bay area.[2]

18th century European use

In pre-modern medicine, these shells were considered an excellent alkali, and apothecaries would pulverize them for use in several preparations. The shell used for this purpose was described by Joseph Pitton de Tournefort in London in the 18th century as being "of a tubular, or conical form, about 3 inches long; of a shining, greenish white; hollow; light, and divided lengthwise by parallel lines, running from top to bottom. It is about the thickness of a feather, and bears some resemblance to a canine tooth." However, it was considered at that time to be very rare, and in lieu of that, another shell was usually substituted. This was described as a multi-colored shell found in the sand where the tide had fallen; this shell was not channeled, or fluted.[3] The large green shell to which the writer first refers must have been either Dentalium elephantinum or Dentalium aprinum, both of which are large and greenish, and live in the Indo-Pacific zone. The other shell was presumably another species, possibly Dentalium entale, which is native to Great Britain.

Species

Species within the genus Dentalium include:

References

  1. ^ "dentalium". Oxford English Dictionary. Oxford University Press. 2nd ed. 1989.
  2. ^ Hogan, 2008
  3. ^  This article incorporates content from the 1728 Cyclopaedia, a publication in the public domain.
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