Overview

Distribution

Range Description

This species occurs in the United States and Canada. The range of this species in the United States extends from the eastern coast, south to a disjunct population in the upper Mississippi drainage, Arizona (Guralnick 2005). In Canada, it is recorded from the north, towards the border with the United States (Guralnick 2005), and from New Brunswick northwest to Quebec and Labrador, and west to the Northwest Territories as far as Great Slave Lake (Mackie 2007). This species has a scattered distribution in subarctic eastern Canada, and in the United States from New Brunswick to Massachusetts, and Illinois (Clarke 1981, Guralnick 2005).
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occurs (regularly, as a native taxon) in multiple nations

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National Distribution

Canada

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

Type of Residency: Year-round

United States

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

Type of Residency: Year-round

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Global Range: This species occurs in the United States and Canada. The range of this species in the United States extends from the eastern coast, south to a disjunct populationn in the upper Mississippi drainage, Arizona (Guralnick, 2005). In Canada, it is recorded from the north, towards the border with the United States (Guralnick, 2005), and from New Brunswick northwest to Quebec and Labrador, and west to the Northwest Territories as far as Great Slave Lake (Mackie, 2007). This species has a scattered distribution in subarctic eastern Canada, and in the United States from New Brunswick to Massachusetts, and Illinois (Clarke, 1981; Guralnick, 2005).

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Ecology

Habitat

Habitat and Ecology

Habitat and Ecology
This species is found in permanent rivers, streams, lakes and ponds. Within the Colorado River this species was found to be abundant in clear water, and in the wide downstream areas, but absent in the backwaters (Stevens et al. 1997). The study area encompassed a 367 km stretch from the Glen Canyon Dam to Diamond Creek, Arizona (Clarke 1981). This species is most frequently found among vegetation, and occurs on a variety of substrates (Clarke 1981).

This species breeds twice a year, with recruitment of the first (over-wintering) generation beginning in July. The second generation of juveniles is recruited in October. The maximum life expectancy is ten months for the over-wintering adults, and four months for the summer adults (Burky and Burky 1976).

Systems
  • Freshwater
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Habitat Type: Freshwater

Comments: This species is found in permanent rivers, streams, lakes and ponds. Within the Colorado River this species was found to be abundant in clear water, and in the wide downstream areas, but absent in the backwaters (Stevens et al., 1997). The study area encompassed a 367 km stretch from the Glen Canyon Dam to Diamond Creek, Arizona (Clarke, 1981). This species is most frequently found among vegetation, and occurs on a variety of substrates (Clarke, 1981).

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Migration

Non-Migrant: No. All populations of this species make significant seasonal migrations.

Locally Migrant: No. No populations of this species make local extended movements (generally less than 200 km) at particular times of the year (e.g., to breeding or wintering grounds, to hibernation sites).

Locally Migrant: No. No populations of this species make annual migrations of over 200 km.

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Population Biology

Number of Occurrences

Note: For many non-migratory species, occurrences are roughly equivalent to populations.

Estimated Number of Occurrences: 21 - 300

Comments: This species is widespread and abundant although uncommon in certain parts of its range. This species is more frequently documented in eastern areas of the United States than the west (Guralnick, 2005). This species is also known from Pleistocene deposits in the Black Hills of Fall River/Custer Cos., South Dakota (Jass et al., 2002).

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Global Abundance

>1,000,000 individuals

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Life History and Behavior

Reproduction

This species breeds twice a year, with recruitment of the first (over-wintering) generation beginning in July. The second generation of juveniles is recruited in October. The maximum life expectancy is ten months for the over-wintering adults, and four months for the summer adults (Burky and Burky, 1976).

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Conservation

Conservation Status

IUCN Red List Assessment


Red List Category
LC
Least Concern

Red List Criteria

Version
3.1

Year Assessed
2012

Assessor/s
Bogan, A. & Cordeiro, J.

Reviewer/s
Bohm, M., Collen, B. & Seddon, M.

Contributor/s
Richman, N., Dyer, E., Soulsby, A.-M., Whitton, F., Kasthala, G., McGuinness, S., Milligan, HT, De Silva, R., Herdson, R., Thorley, J., McMillan, K., Collins, A., Offord, S. & Duncan, C.

Justification
Pisidium walkeri has been assessed as Least Concern. This species has a large geographical range that extends across a large part of North America. Pisidium walkeri is able to tolerate a wide variety of habitats, does not appear to be affected by any major threats at present and has not been recognized as a species of concern by any federal or state legislation.
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National NatureServe Conservation Status

Canada

Rounded National Status Rank: N5 - Secure

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: N4 - Apparently Secure

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NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: G5 - Secure

Reasons: This species has a large geographical range that extends across a large part of North America. Pisidium walkeri is able to tolerate a wide variety of habitats, and has not been recognized as a species of concern by any federal or state legislation.

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Population

Population
This species is widespread and abundant although uncommon in certain parts of its range. This species is more frequently documented in eastern areas of the United States than the west (Guralnick 2005). On a global scale, this species is believed to be secure under present conditions (Ontario Natural Heritage Information Centre 2008).

Population Trend
Unknown
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Threats

Major Threats
It is unlikely that there are major threats imapcting this species. This species is able to tolerate short-term habitat disturbance and is believed to be secure on a global scale (Ontario Natural Heritage Information Centre 2008, Montana Field Guide 2008). However, this source states there is some cause for concern in the long-term due to declines resulting from habitat degradation and destruction.
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Comments: It is unlikely that there are major threats imapcting this species. This species is able to tolerate short-term habitat disturbance and is believed to be secure on a global scale

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Management

Conservation Actions

Conservation Actions
This species has been assigned a NatureServe Global Heritage Status Rank of G5 - Secure, a National Status Rank of N5 - Secure for the US, and N4N5 - Apparently Secure or Secure for Canada, a State/Province Status Rank of S4 - Apparently Secure for Ontario, Canada, and S3 - Vulnerable for Virginia, and has not been assessed in Massachusetts, Michigan, Montana and Wisconsin in the US and Manitoba and Quebec in Canada (NatureServe 2009). There are no specific conservation measures in place for this species.
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