Articles on this page are available in 1 other language: Dutch (1) (learn more)

Overview

Brief Summary

The curled octopus is related to the octopus. It is named after the way it curls up its arms. A row of suction feet are found on the eight slender arms. The curled octopus uses these arms to catch its prey. Just like other cuttlefish, it can recognize objects with its excellent eyesight. It closely observes scuba divers, following every movement. As soon as it no longer trusts the situation, it rapidly disappears behind a curtain of ink.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© Copyright Ecomare

Source: Ecomare

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Biology

Like all cephalopods, the curled octopus is an active predator (4). It usually feeds on crustaceans, molluscs and other invertebrates as well as fish (4). When feeding on crabs, the curled octopus immobilises its prey by puncturing its eye and injecting toxins into the body of the crab. The digestive enzymes contained in the saliva of the octopus break down the attachments within the crab's body, allowing the carapace to be easily removed (4).
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Wildscreen

Source: ARKive

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Description

The cephalopods (meaning 'head-footed'), a group of molluscs that contain the octopuses, squid and cuttlefish, are probably the most intelligent of all invertebrates. They have well-developed heads, with large eyes and mouths that feature beak-like jaws. All octopuses have eight tentacle-like arms; indeed 'octopus' derives from the Greek for 'eight-footed' (5). The curled octopus is typically yellowish or reddish-orange in colour with rusty-brown patches and a whitish underside; individuals are able to rapidly change colour to suit their surroundings (3). The slender arms taper towards the tips; they feature a single row of suckers and are curled when the octopus is at rest, hence the common name (3).
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Wildscreen

Source: ARKive

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Comprehensive Description

Description

 A broad mantled octopus up to 50 cm in length, with a smooth or finely tuberculate body. The arms are slender, finely tapered distally and curled when at rest, with a single row of suckers. The colour is predominantly red-brown dorsally and white ventrally but species are able to change colour quickly to match their background.Also commonly known as the lesser octopus or horned octopus. Spelling can also be Eledone cirrosa.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

©  The Marine Biological Association of the United Kingdom

Source: Marine Life Information Network

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Distribution

Range

Found around the British coastline; it also occurs in the northeast Atlantic and in the Mediterranean (3).
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Wildscreen

Source: ARKive

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Ecology

Habitat

neritic to bathyal
  • UNESCO-IOC Register of Marine Organisms
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© WoRMS for SMEBD

Source: World Register of Marine Species

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Depth range based on 117 specimens in 1 taxon.
Water temperature and chemistry ranges based on 66 samples.

Environmental ranges
  Depth range (m): 0 - 470
  Temperature range (°C): 7.134 - 17.600
  Nitrate (umol/L): 0.729 - 12.103
  Salinity (PPS): 34.841 - 38.670
  Oxygen (ml/l): 4.242 - 6.439
  Phosphate (umol/l): 0.112 - 0.814
  Silicate (umol/l): 2.193 - 5.784

Graphical representation

Depth range (m): 0 - 470

Temperature range (°C): 7.134 - 17.600

Nitrate (umol/L): 0.729 - 12.103

Salinity (PPS): 34.841 - 38.670

Oxygen (ml/l): 4.242 - 6.439

Phosphate (umol/l): 0.112 - 0.814

Silicate (umol/l): 2.193 - 5.784
 
Note: this information has not been validated. Check this *note*. Your feedback is most welcome.

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

 Found on rocky coasts, lower shore, sublittoral.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

©  The Marine Biological Association of the United Kingdom

Source: Marine Life Information Network

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Inhabits rocky coastal areas (3).
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Wildscreen

Source: ARKive

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Conservation

Conservation Status

Status

Common and widespread.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Wildscreen

Source: ARKive

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Threats

Not currently threatened.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Wildscreen

Source: ARKive

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Management

Conservation

Conservation action has not been targeted at this common species.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Wildscreen

Source: ARKive

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Wikipedia

Curled octopus

The curled octopus (Eledone cirrhosa) is a species of cephalopod found in the sublittoral zone of rocky coasts around the British Isles. It is alternatively known as the lesser octopus or horned octopus.

Contents

Description

Dorsal view

It has a broad, ovoid-shaped mantle up to 50 cm long. The head is narrower than the rest of the body with a filament over each eye. The octopus's colour is yellowish or reddish-orange to reddish-brown dorsally with diffuse rust-brown patches, and white on the underside. The skin is covered with very fine, closely set granulations, interspersed with larger warts. The relatively short arms have a single series of suckers on them and at rest are held with the tips lightly curled, hence the species's common name.[2]

Oral and ventral view

Habitat and distribution

The curled octopus is found in rocky coasts at depths of between 10 and 150 m (sometimes down to 800 m) in the Atlantic Ocean, the English Channel, the North Sea, and the Mediterranean Sea. In recent years the North Sea populations have increased due to overfishing of large predatory fish such as Atlantic cod. This has had a knock on effect on crab and lobster fisheries as the curled octopus readily enters pots to take the bait or the catch.

Diet

The curled octopus feeds on crabs and other large crustaceans. It is cited as a significant predator of such commercially important species as Homarus gammarus (European lobster), Nephrops norvegicus (Norway lobster), and Cancer pagurus (edible crab) from traps.[3]

Biology

The growth rate of the curled octopus is quite rapid and its life span is generally short at 1–5 years, although there may be some variation between warmer and colder areas. The curled octopus matures at around 1 year (on reaching a size of 12–40 cm for females, slightly smaller for males) and with 1,000–5,000 eggs laid on average. It breeds at a lower rate than the partially sympatric Octopus vulgaris (common octopus). Populations are apparently at their lowest density in the autumn, probably due to post-spawning die off as reproduction involves females laying eggs, guarding them and dying once the eggs hatch. Curled octopuses are solitary animals, generally inhabiting depths of less than 100 m, and more common in shallow water, but they have been found down to 800 m.

Fisheries

The curled octopus is taken as bycatch in trawl fisheries for other species. It is also captured in earthenware pots in the Mediterranean, although the fishery for curled octopuses is less important than that of the common octopus. International Council for the Exploration of the Sea (ICES) catch data for both the curled octopus and common octopus, from all ICES regions (NE Atlantic) in 2006, indicated around 8,999 tonnes, but more recent estimates indicate a substantial increase to around 19,000 tonnes in 2008 (ICES WGCEPH, 2010). Nearly all landings of both species within these regions are taken by Portugal and Spain, with Spain taking the vast majority, although most of these will be of the common octopus.[4] Neither species is subject to either stock assessment or quota controls in Europe and in the case of the curled octopus there is no minimum size for landing.[5]

References

  1. ^ "Eledone cirrhosa (Lamarck, 1798)". Integrated Taxonomic Information System. http://www.itis.gov/servlet/SingleRpt/SingleRpt?search_topic=TSN&search_value=82646.
  2. ^ Wilson, Emily (2008) "Eledone cirrhosa. Curled octopus". Marine Life Information Network: Biology and Sensitivity Key Information Sub-programme. Plymouth: Marine Biological Association of the United Kingdom. Retrieved 24/01/2012
  3. ^ Boyle, P.R. (1986). "A Descriptive Ecology of Eledone cirrhosa (Mollusca: Cephalopoda) in Scottish Waters." Journal of the Marine Biological Association of the United Kingdom, 66: 855–865. doi:10.1017/S0025315400048487
  4. ^ Curled octopus at Fish online
  5. ^ http://cmsdata.iucn.org/downloads/iucn_hotel_guide_final.pdf
Creative Commons Attribution Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-SA 3.0)

Source: Wikipedia

Unreviewed

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Disclaimer

EOL content is automatically assembled from many different content providers. As a result, from time to time you may find pages on EOL that are confusing.

To request an improvement, please leave a comment on the page. Thank you!