Overview

Brief Summary

Introduction

H. miranda is often the most common histioteuthid captured within its habitat. This species is believed to be associated with shallow ocean-floor topography. It is broadly distributed in southern waters but Voss et al., 1998, found no indication of population differentiation throughout the range of this species.

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Comprehensive Description

Characteristics

  1. Tubercles
    1. Arms I with 14-19 tubercules; arms II with 11-16 tubercules and arms III with 7-13.
    2. Length of tubercule-rows 19-39% of arm lengths.
  2. Photophores
    1. Arms IV with 5 longitudinal series on arm base.

Comments

More details of the description can be found here.

Species of the miranda-group are distinguished by the following characteristics:

  1. Tubercles
    1. Present on dorsal midline of mantle and aboral surface of arms I-III.
  2. Photophores
    1. In 5-6 series on arm IV base.
    2. Compound photophores of uniform, medium size on anterior 3/4 of ventral mantle.

H. miranda is most easily separated from the other member of the miranda-group, H. oceani, by (1) the lesser number of photophores on the base of arms IV (5 vs 6), (2) the lesser number of tubercules in on each arm, (3) the lesser length of the tubercule rows on the arms, and the divided buccal connectives to arms II (attach to arms I and II).

The above data are taken from Voss, et al. (1998).

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Distribution

Range Description

This species occurs around Australia and New Zealand and off the south and southwest of Africa, and Somalia (Young and Vecchione 2000).
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Source: IUCN

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Geographical distribution

Type locality: South by southeast of Gabo Island, Victoria, Australia (ca. 38°S,150°E). H. miranda is found off southwest Africa eastward to the Australia-New Zealand area. It occurs near continental slopes, islands and submarine rises (Voss, et al., 1998).

Figure. Distribution chart of H. miranda. Chart modified from Voss et al. (1998).

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Physical Description

Type Information

Neotype for Calliteuthis miranda Berry, 1918
Catalog Number: USNM 576165
Collection: Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of Natural History, Department of Invertebrate Zoology
Sex/Stage: female;
Preparation: Isopropyl Alcohol
Collector(s): University of Southern California
Year Collected: 1966
Locality: North Island, off East Cape, New Zealand, South Pacific Ocean
Depth (m): 448 to 732
Vessel: Eltanin R/V
  • Neotype: Berry, S. 1918. Biol. Results Fish. Exp. Endeavour. 4(5): 221-228, pls. 61-62.
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© Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of Natural History, Department of Invertebrate Zoology

Source: National Museum of Natural History Collections

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Ecology

Habitat

Habitat and Ecology

Habitat and Ecology
This species appears to show a preference for continental and island slope, and submarine rise habitats (Young and Vecchione 2000). It is also the most common histioteuthid species in South African waters (Hoving and Lipinski 2009). Small juveniles (15-25 mm in mantle length) occur from near surface waters to 850 m in depth, while larger juveniles, subadults and mature individuals occur in midwater, as well as on or near the seafloor between 200 and 1,200 m (Voss et al. 1998). Mature individuals show sexual dimorphism in body size with females attaining larger sizes (Hoving and Lipinski 2009). The ovarian oocyte length frequency distribution in mature females suggests they spawn all their eggs at once in a short space of time. They may spawn between 89,000 and 148,000 eggs (Hoving and Lipinski 2009). Unvalidated statolith growth increment analysis suggest females mature between 10 and 15 months, while males may mature at a younger age of around 6 months and live for approximately 15 months (Hoving and Lipinski 2009). This species is preyed upon by sperm whales and other toothed whales, and its diet includes deep water species of shrimp (Hoving and Lipinski 2009).

Systems
  • Marine
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Source: IUCN

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Known from seamounts and knolls
  • Stocks, K. 2009. Seamounts Online: an online information system for seamount biology. Version 2009-1. World Wide Web electronic publication.
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© WoRMS for SMEBD

Source: World Register of Marine Species

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mesopelagic
  • UNESCO-IOC Register of Marine Organisms
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Source: World Register of Marine Species

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Depth range based on 51 specimens in 1 taxon.
Water temperature and chemistry ranges based on 37 samples.

Environmental ranges
  Depth range (m): 59 - 1150
  Temperature range (°C): 3.145 - 18.661
  Nitrate (umol/L): 5.961 - 35.108
  Salinity (PPS): 34.336 - 35.560
  Oxygen (ml/l): 3.987 - 5.047
  Phosphate (umol/l): 0.500 - 2.394
  Silicate (umol/l): 2.623 - 52.299

Graphical representation

Depth range (m): 59 - 1150

Temperature range (°C): 3.145 - 18.661

Nitrate (umol/L): 5.961 - 35.108

Salinity (PPS): 34.336 - 35.560

Oxygen (ml/l): 3.987 - 5.047

Phosphate (umol/l): 0.500 - 2.394

Silicate (umol/l): 2.623 - 52.299
 
Note: this information has not been validated. Check this *note*. Your feedback is most welcome.

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Life History and Behavior

Life Cycle

Life History

Females are mature at 200-267 mm ML; males at 93-262 mm ML.

Figure. Dorsal and ventral views of two growth stages of H. miranda. Left - 17 mm ML, 32°S, 174°E. Right - 36 mm ML, 34°S, 16°. Drawings from Voss, et al. (1998).

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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Barcode data: Histioteuthis miranda

The following is a representative barcode sequence, the centroid of all available sequences for this species.


There is 1 barcode sequence available from BOLD and GenBank.

Below is the sequence of the barcode region Cytochrome oxidase subunit 1 (COI or COX1) from a member of the species.

See the BOLD taxonomy browser for more complete information about this specimen.

Other sequences that do not yet meet barcode criteria may also be available.

ACTCTTTACTTCATCTTTGGAATTTGAGCCGGCCTACTAGGAACCTCTTTA---AGATTAATAATCCGAACTGAGTTAGGCCAACCAGGCTCACTACTTAATGAC---GATCAATTATATAATGTGGTAGTTACCGCTCATGGGTTTATCATAATTTTCTTTTTAGTTATACCAATTATAATTGGAGGTTTTGGTAACTGACTAGTCCCTTTAATA---TTGGGAGCTCCTGATATAGCTTTCCCTCGAATAAATAATATAAGATTCTGACTCTTGCCTCCCTCCCTAACTCTACTTTTAACTTCATCCGCTGTAGAAAGAGGAGCAGGAACAGGATGAACAGTTTATCCTCCTCTATCTAGGAACTTATCCCATGCAGGCCCTTCGGTAGATCTT---GCTATTTTTTCTCTACATTTAGCTGGAGTATCCTCAATTCTAGGAGCAATTAATTTTATTACAACAATTTTAAATATACGATGAGAAGGTTTACAAATAGAACGTGTACCTCTCTTTGCCTGATCCGTATTTATTACAGCCATTCTTCTACTACTATCCCTTCCAGTACTAGCAGGA---GCAATTACTATACTTTTGACAGATCGAAATTTTAACACAACTTTTTTTGATCCCAGGGGAGGAGGCGACCCTATTCTATACCAACATTTA
-- end --

Download FASTA File

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© Barcode of Life Data Systems

Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

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Statistics of barcoding coverage: Histioteuthis miranda

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 1
Specimens with Barcodes: 1
Species With Barcodes: 1
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© Barcode of Life Data Systems

Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

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Conservation

Conservation Status

IUCN Red List Assessment


Red List Category
LC
Least Concern

Red List Criteria

Version
3.1

Year Assessed
2014

Assessor/s
Barratt, I. & Allcock, L.

Reviewer/s
Vecchione, M., Young, R. & Böhm, M.

Contributor/s
Duncan, C. & Carrete-Vega, G.

Justification
Histioteuthis miranda is an oceanic species which has been assessed as Least Concern, as it has a wide geographic distribution, making it less susceptible to human impact, and because it is known to be abundant in some parts of its range. However, further research is recommended in order to determine the precise distribution, population dynamics, life history and ecology, and potential threat processes affecting this species.
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Source: IUCN

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Population

Population
There is no population information available for this species.

Population Trend
Unknown
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Source: IUCN

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Threats

Major Threats
The threats to this species are not known.
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Source: IUCN

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Management

Conservation Actions

Conservation Actions
There are no species-specific conservation measures in place for this species. Further research is recommended in order to determine the precise distribution, population dynamics, life history and ecology, and potential threat processes affecting this species.
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Source: IUCN

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