Overview

Comprehensive Description

Description

Inflorescence of terminal capitula with 1-several rows of bracts. Involucel cylindric, 8-furrowed, expanded above into a membranous, many veined, spreading corona. Calyx with 5 persistent bristles spreading in fruit. Corolla of 5 unequal lobes (rarely 4-6), those of the outer often longer than the inner.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© Mark Hyde, Bart Wursten and Petra Ballings

Source: Flora of Zimbabwe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Ecology

Associations

Foodplant / pathogen
Aphelenchoides blastophthorus infects and damages flower bud of Scabiosa 'Simon Greaves'
Other: major host/prey

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

In Great Britain and/or Ireland:
Foodplant / nest
female of Andrena hattorfiana provisions nest with pollen of Scabiosa

Foodplant / nest
female of Andrena marginata provisions nest with pollen of Scabiosa

Foodplant / pathogen
Aphelenchoides blastophthorus infects and damages flower bud of Scabiosa

Foodplant / gall
Eriophyes squalidus causes gall of shoot tip of Scabiosa

Foodplant / sap sucker
Macrosiphum rosae sucks sap of live Scabiosa
Remarks: season: summer
Other: minor host/prey

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD) Stats
                                        
Specimen Records:20Public Records:12
Specimens with Sequences:19Public Species:4
Specimens with Barcodes:19Public BINs:0
Species:4         
Species With Barcodes:4         
          
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© Barcode of Life Data Systems

Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Barcode data

Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© Barcode of Life Data Systems

Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Locations of barcode samples

Collection Sites: world map showing specimen collection locations for Scabiosa

Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© Barcode of Life Data Systems

Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Wikipedia

Scabiosa

Scabiosa /skbiˈsə/[1] is a genus in the teasel Family Dipsacaceae of flowering plants. Many of the species in this genus have common names that include the word scabious; however some plants commonly known as scabious are currently classified in related genera such as Knautia and Succisa; at least some of these were formerly placed in Scabiosa. Another common name for members of this genus is pincushion flowers.

Members of this genus are native to Europe and Asia. Some species of Scabiosa, notably small scabious (S. columbaria) and Mediterranean sweet scabious (S. atropurpurea) have been developed into cultivars for gardeners.

Scabiosa plants have many small flowers of soft lavender blue, lilac or creamy white colour borne in a single head on a tall stalk. Scabious flowers are nectar rich and attract a variety of insects including moths and butterflies such as the Six-spot Burnet. Scabiosa species are also used as food plants by the larvae of some Lepidoptera species including Grey Pug.

In 1782, a mysterious pale yellow scabious, called Scabiosa trenta, was described by Belsazar Hacquet, an Austrian physician, botanist, and mountaineer, in his work Plantae alpinae Carniolicae. It became a great source of inspiration for later botanists and mountaineers discovering the Julian Alps, especially Julius Kugy. The Austrian botanist Anton Kerner von Marilaun later proved Belsazar Hacquet had not found a new species, but a specimen of the already known submediterranean Cephalaria leucantha.[2]

Species[edit]

Among others:

References[edit]

  1. ^ Sunset Western Garden Book, 1995:606–607
  2. ^ Nada Praprotnik. "Trenta Scabious (Scabiosa Trenta)". Republic of Slovenia: Government Communications Office. 
Creative Commons Attribution Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-SA 3.0)

Source: Wikipedia

Unreviewed

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Disclaimer

EOL content is automatically assembled from many different content providers. As a result, from time to time you may find pages on EOL that are confusing.

To request an improvement, please leave a comment on the page. Thank you!