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Overview

Distribution

National Distribution

Canada

Origin: Exotic

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Unknown/Undetermined

Confidence: Confident

United States

Origin: Exotic

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Unknown/Undetermined

Confidence: Confident

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Distribution: Recorded from most parts of the world, though not known in the wild.
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Physical Description

Morphology

Description

Rhizome thick, plant 60-120 cm tall. Leaves 30-40 cm long, 2.0-4.5 cm broad, ensiform, glaucous. Peduncle (stem) up to 100 cm long, up to 3 branches with 4-5 flowers. Bract and bracteoles up to 5 cm long, scarious in upper half, often purplish. Perianth lavender, violet or bluish with brownish veins in lower parts; tube 2-2.5 cm; falls 7-9 ´ 4-5 cm, obovate-cuneate at base; beard white or pale blue; standard 7-9 ´ 4-5 cm, obovate or elliptic with a narrow claw at the base. Filament c. 1.8 cm long, pale-purple, anther white, subequal. pedicel short, ovary c. 1.6 cm long, style branches 4-4.5 ´ 1.5 cm, lobes obtuse 1-1.5 ´ 0.6-1 cm. Capsule 3-5 cm, ellipsoid, rare. Seeds pyriform, wrinkled, acute.
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Description

Rhizomes homogeneous, usually many-branched, light brown, 1.2–2 cm diam., smooth, nodes marked by rings around rhizome, branches may arise in the fan or as many as 15–20 nodes produced prior to active leaves. Stems green, 2–3-branched, solid, 6–12 dm × 1–1.5 cm, glaucous. Leaves equitant, blade sometimes purplish at base, ensiform, to 4.5 dm × 3.5 cm, glaucous. Inflorescences with terminal unit 2–3-flowered, branch units 1–2-flowered; spathes green, sometimes with purple base, 2–5 cm, herbaceous with narrow, scarious margins and tip. Flowers: perianth shades of blue-violet, yellow, brown, or white with various patterns of pigment distribution; floral tube 1–2.5 cm; sepals spreading, drooping, or somewhat reflexed, blue-violet, yellow, brown, or white with patterned overlay of darker blue-violet, with white or yellow beard along midrib of claw and lower part of limb, obovate limb tapering gradually to claw, 6–7.5 × 4–5.5 cm; petals alternating with sepals, erect, obovate, 5–7 × 4–5.5 cm, with short, 1.5–2 cm, channeled claw; ovary roundly trigonal, 1.5–2.5 cm, slightly wider than floral tube. Capsules borne on ends of stems and branches, roundly 3-lobed, 3–5 × 2.5 cm, apex with short remnant of floral tube. Seeds in 2 rows per locule, red-brown, oval, 3–4 mm, wrinkled. 2n = 24.
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Ecology

Habitat

Habitat & Distribution

Flowering mid Apr--mid Jun. Widely grown, may persist after cultivation; introduced; c, s Europe.
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Associations

Foodplant / parasite
hypophyllous telium of Puccinia iridis parasitises live leaf of Iris germanica

Foodplant / parasite
immersed or erumpent pseudothecium of Trematosphaeria heterospora parasitises rhizome of Iris germanica

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Life History and Behavior

Cyclicity

Flower/Fruit

Fl. Per.: April-May. Vern.: Keore ka mul, Bikh-i-banafshah.
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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Barcode data: Iris germanica

The following is a representative barcode sequence, the centroid of all available sequences for this species.


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Statistics of barcoding coverage: Iris germanica

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 3
Specimens with Barcodes: 7
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Conservation

Conservation Status

National NatureServe Conservation Status

Canada

Rounded National Status Rank: NNA - Not Applicable

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: NNA - Not Applicable

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NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: GNR - Not Yet Ranked

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Management

These species are introduced in Switzerland.
  • Aeschimann, D. & C. Heitz. 2005. Synonymie-Index der Schweizer Flora und der angrenzenden Gebiete (SISF). 2te Auflage. Documenta Floristicae Helvetiae N° 2. Genève.   http://www.crsf.ch/ External link.
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Wikipedia

Iris variegata

Iris variegata, the Hungarian Iris, is a species in the genus Iris. Once known as 'Iris hungarica'.[3]

It was described in 1753 by Carl Linnaeus.[4]

Between 1800 and 1850, several Iris breeders (including Lemoin, Jacques and Salter), started breeding border irises for the garden. These Irises were all the progeny of two species, iris pallida and iris variegata. [5]

Hundreds of hybrids exist representing every colour from jet black to sparkling whites. The only colour really missing is bright scarlet. Many modern garden bearded irises are crosses of iris germanica and iris variegata.[1]

Description[edit]

Iris variegata' grows up to 45 cm high and 30 cm wide. The roots can go up to 10 cm deep. It is a rhizomatous perennial that blooms in May to June. Lifting, dividing and replanting the rhizomes is best done once flowering has finished as this is when the plant grows the new shoots that will flower the following year. The rhizomes are placed on the surface of the soil facing towards the sun and with at least 45cm of open ground in front of them - this allows two years growth and flowering. The plant is held in place by removing half the leaf mass to reduce wind rock and by using the old roots as anchors in the soil. The rhizome is placed on well dug ground and the roots placed either side into 10cm deep grooves. The soil os then gently firmed around the roots, so holding the plant steady. New roots and leaves are created rapidly as the rhizome moves forwards.

The flowers are yellowish-white, with brown-purple veins on the falls. It has between 3-6 flowers per stem.[1]

Cultivars[edit]

  • 'Staten Island' (registered in 1945)[6]
  • 'Gracchus' (1884)[7]
  • 'Mary Vernon' (1940) [6]

Subspecies[edit]

  • I. reginae
  • I. amoena (white standards, lilac/mauve falls)[6]

Habitat[edit]

Found in the Pannonian (ancient Roman province) region of central Europe. It occurs in southern Moravia, southern Slovakia, south-western Germany, southern Romania, Bulgaria and western Ukraine. It has been introduced into Switzerland, Bohemia and Italy. It is an endangered and protected species in the Czech Republic and Slovakia. It grows on the sunny slopes of the steppes and beside forest margins.[8]

Gallery[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "Iris variegata (Hungarian iris". kew.org. Retrieved 20 June 2014. 
  2. ^ "Iris variegata L.". eunis.eea.europa.eu. Retrieved 21 June 2014. 
  3. ^ Sweet, Robert The British Flower Garden: Containing Coloured Figures and descriptions of Hardy Herbaceous Plants, Volume 1, p. 74, at Google Books
  4. ^ Kelly D. Norris A Guide to Bearded Irises: Cultivating the Rainbow for Beginners and Enthusiasts, p. 122, at Google Books
  5. ^ Wister, John C. (October 1920). "NOTES ON THE HISTORY OF THE BEARDED IRIS". Journal of The New York Botanical Garden 21(250): 181-191. Retrieved 21 June 2014. 
  6. ^ a b c Stebbings, Geoff (1997). The Gardener's Guide to Growing Irises. Newton Abbot: David and Charles. p. 27. ISBN 0715305395. 
  7. ^ "PlantFiles: Miniature Tall Bearded Iris, Historic Iris Iris variegata 'Gracchus'". davesgarden.com. 2004. Retrieved 21 June 2014. 
  8. ^ Hoskovec, Ladislav (8 February 2014). "Iris variegata L. - Hungarian Iris". botany.cz. Retrieved 20 June 2014. 

See also[edit]

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Iris germanica

Iris germanica, the German Iris, is a species in the genus Iris.

Habit[edit]

Iris germanica' grows up to 120 cm high and 30 cm wide. The roots can go up to 10 cm deep. It is a rhizomatous perennial that blooms in April to June. Lifting, dividing and replanting the rhizomes is best done once flowering has finished as this is when the plant grows the new shoots that will flower the following year. The rhizomes are placed on the surface of the soil facing towards the sun and with at least 45cm of open ground in front of them - this allows two years growth and flowering. The plant is held in place by removing half the leaf mass to reduce wind rock and by using the old roots as anchors in the soil. The rhizome is placed on well dug ground and the roots placed either side into 10cm deep grooves. The soil os then gently firmed around the roots, so holding the plant steady. New roots and leaves are created rapidly as the rhizome moves forwards.

Hundreds of hybrids exist representing every colour from jet black to sparkling whites. The only colour really missing is bright scarlet.

It is a European hybrid, rather than a true wild species. [1]

Varieties :

  • I. g. var. florentina
  • I. g. var. germanica

I. germanica is known to produce the isoflavone irilone.[2]

References[edit]

See also[edit]

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Iris croatica

Iris croatica is a bearded rhizomatous species of iris (subgenus Iris) endemic to Croatia.

It grows mostly in the woods of Downy Oak (Quercus pubescens) and Black Hophornbeam (Ostrya carpinifolia) on dolomite and limestone soils.[1] It is known from hilly parts of continental Croatia including the hills of Samoborsko gorje (near Samobor), the hill Cesargradska gora (near Klanjec), near Josipdol, on the hill of Strahinjčica (near Radoboj), and at Zagrebačko gorje and Žumberačko gorje.[1] It was described in 1962 by botanists Ivo and Marija Horvat.[1][2]

It is on the Croatian list of strictly protected plants, among nine Iridaceae species.[3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Zima, Dinko; Tomašević, Mirko (January 2009). "Locality of the species Iris croatica Horvat et Horvat, M. in Požega Valley". Agronomy journal (in Croatian) (Zagreb, Croatia: Croatian society of agronomists) 70 (5): 513. ISSN 0002-1954. Retrieved 2012-06-06. 
  2. ^ Horvat, Ivo; Horvat, Marija (1961–1962). "Iris croatica – nova vrsta perunike u Hrvatskoj". Acta Botanica Croatica (in Croatian) (Zagreb: Division of Biology, Faculty of Science, University of Zagreb). 20/21: 7–20. ISSN 0365-0588. 
  3. ^ Ministry of Culture (Croatia) (2004-07-20). "Pravilnik o skupljanju samoniklih biljaka u svrhu prerade, trgovine i drugog prometa". Narodne novine (in Croatian) (04/100). Retrieved 2012-06-06. 
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Notes

Comments

Widely cultivated as an ornamental plant. The fertility is reported to be low, hence its hybrid origin is suspected. It occurs on comparatively dry, rocky places, usually in or near cultivated areas or cemetries, 50-600 m (B. Mathew, l.c. 393. 1984).  

Roots are reputed to have medicinal properties. Rhizomes yield an essential oil used in perfumery, cosmetics etc. Extracts of rhizomes are used in meat curing. Leaves are rich source of ascorbic acid and vitamin P (Ambasta, Ramachandaran, Kashyapa & Chan, Usef. Pl. Ind. 294. 1986).

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Comments

Iris germanica is considered to have been a natural hybrid between I. pallida and I. variegata Linnaeus, both of which also have the chromosome number 2n = 24. Whenever an interbreeding population of a fertile natural hybrid occurs, the plants can be expected to exhibit characters varying from one parental extreme to the other, and this is certainly true in the case of I. germanica. Iris pallida has striking silvery spathes subtending the flowers, whereas I. variegata has completely green or purplish, herbaceous spathes. Usually I. germanica has the spathes green or purplish at the base with scarious margins. Since I. pallida is up to 1 m tall and I. variegata is only up to 4 dm tall, I. germanica would be expected to be intermediate in height (this is true), but the forms have subsequently been selected for greater height and thus have become established as the “tall bearded irises.” 

 The perianths of Iris pallida are primarily blue, but one form had the blue pigment limited to stipples or stitches on the margins of both sepals and petals, and this recessive pattern was carried over into I. germanica. The perianths of I. variegata are yellow, with the veins of the sepals marked with a dark blue-violet that gives, along with the yellow background, a purple or brown effect. In some forms, the pigment of these veins spreads over most of the surface of the sepals, leaving only a small band of background color along the margins. In I. germanica, if this pattern introduced from I. variegata is added to a light blue-violet background, the petals remain light blue and the sepals become a very dark violet with light blue margins; this form has been called I. neglecta Hornemann. If the pattern is added to a white flower, the result has been called I. amoena de Candolle. A form in which the dark blue veins were replaced by white has been named I. leucographa Kerner. Another form in which this white pigment had spread to produce a large white area on the sepals with a narrow yellow border has been called I. flavescens Delile. All of these forms were known early in the breeding of the garden cultivars of I. germanica and added greatly to their popularity. J. C. Wister (1927) said that Iris pallida and I. variegata were the only species involved in the production of I. germanica until about 1889, when Sir Michael Foster of England had several large-flowered irises sent to him from the eastern part of the Mediterranean: I. cypriana Foster & Baker, I. trojana A. Kerner ex Stapf, and I. mesopotamica Dykes. These he crossed with the best of the I. germanica forms that he had. He didn’t know it at the time, but these Mediterranean species were tetraploids, and with them he began to produce larger plants and more different patterns, which changed the entire direction of iris breeding. Since that time, many other species from Europe and Asia have been brought into the breeding: I. subbiflora Brotero, I. humilis M. Bieberstein, I. reichenbachii Heuffel, I. imbricata Lindley, I. attica Boissier & Heldreich, I. aphylla Linnaeus, I. albicans Lange, and many others. The plants resulting from hybridization with those other species can not be considered as I. germanica, but must have another name: I. ×conglomerata N. C. Henderson has been proposed.

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