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Overview

Distribution

National Distribution

Canada

Origin: Exotic

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Unknown/Undetermined

Confidence: Confident

United States

Origin: Exotic

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Unknown/Undetermined

Confidence: Confident

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Ecology

Associations

Plant / associate
adult of Aneurus avenius is associated with dead twig of Viburnum lantana

In Great Britain and/or Ireland:
Foodplant / saprobe
fruitbody of Basidioradulum radula is saprobic on old, dead, fallen trunk of Viburnum lantana

Foodplant / saprobe
fruitbody of Byssomerulius corium is saprobic on fallen, decayed wood of Viburnum lantana
Other: minor host/prey

Foodplant / saprobe
scattered, erumpent, plurilocular stroma of Cytospora coelomycetous anamorph of Cytospora lantanae is saprobic on dead twig of Viburnum lantana
Remarks: season: 1-5

Foodplant / saprobe
clustered pycnidium of Diplodia coelomycetous anamorph of Diplodia lantanae is saprobic on dead branch of Viburnum lantana

Foodplant / parasite
Erysiphe hedwigii parasitises Viburnum lantana

Foodplant / saprobe
usually scattered, immersed then erumpent pycnidium of Phomopsis coelomycetous anamorph of Phomopsis tinea is saprobic on dead branch of Viburnum lantana
Remarks: season: 4-5

Foodplant / open feeder
adult of Pyrrhalta viburni grazes on live leaf of Viburnum lantana
Remarks: season: 7-

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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Barcode data: Viburnum lantana

The following is a representative barcode sequence, the centroid of all available sequences for this species.


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Statistics of barcoding coverage: Viburnum lantana

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 9
Specimens with Barcodes: 12
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Conservation

Conservation Status

National NatureServe Conservation Status

Canada

Rounded National Status Rank: NNA - Not Applicable

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: NNA - Not Applicable

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NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: GNR - Not Yet Ranked

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Wikipedia

Viburnum lantana

Viburnum lantana (Wayfarer or Wayfaring Tree) is a species of Viburnum, native to central, southern and western Europe (north to Yorkshire in England), northwest Africa, and southwestern Asia.[1][2][3] The vigorous deciduous European treelike shrub is common along waysides.

It is a deciduous shrub or small tree growing to 4–5 m tall. The leaves are opposite, simple oval to lanceolate, 6–13 cm wide and 4–9 cm broad, with a finely serrated margin; they are densely downy on the underside, less so on the upper surface. The hermaphrodite flowers are small (5 mm), creamy-white, produced in dense cymes 4–10 cm width at the top of the stems; they are produced in early summer, and pollinated by insects. The fruit is an oblong drupe 8 mm long, green at first, turning red, then finally black at full maturity, and contains a single seed. The seeds are dispersed when birds eat the fruit, then deposit the seeds in another location in their droppings.[2][3]

An older name for the plant is hoarwithy. "Hoar" means grey-haired and refers to the hairs under the leaves, and "withy" means a pliant stem.[4]

Cultivation and uses[edit]

It is commonly grown as an ornamental plant for its flowers and berries, growing best on alkaline soils. A number of cultivars have been selected, including 'Aureum', with yellow leaves in spring.[3]

The fruit is mildly toxic, and may cause vomiting or diarrhea if consumed in large quantities.[5]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Flora Europaea: Viburnum lantana
  2. ^ a b Blamey, M. & Grey-Wilson, C. (1989). Flora of Britain and Northern Europe. ISBN 0-340-40170-2
  3. ^ a b c Huxley, A., ed. (1992). New RHS Dictionary of Gardening. Macmillan ISBN 0-333-47494-5.
  4. ^ Reader's Digest Field Guide to the Trees and Shrubs of Britain p.87.
  5. ^ Plants for a Future: Viburnum lantana
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