Articles on this page are available in 1 other language: Spanish (1) (learn more)

Overview

Distribution

National Distribution

United States

Origin: Exotic

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Unknown/Undetermined

Confidence: Confident

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

National Distribution

United States

Origin: Unknown/Undetermined

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Unknown/Undetermined

Confidence: Confident

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Distribution in Egypt

Nile region, oases, Mediterranean region and western desert.

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Bibliotheca Alexandrina

Source: Bibliotheca Alexandrina - EOL Ar

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Global Distribution

Native to Australia.

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Bibliotheca Alexandrina

Source: Bibliotheca Alexandrina - EOL Ar

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

introduced; Ariz., Calif.; Mexico; Australia.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Physical Description

Morphology

Description

Herbs perennial, to 2 m tall. Stems erect, much branched, slightly ribbed. Leaves shortly petiolate; leaf blade ovate to rhombic-ovate, usually 1-1.5 × 0.6-1 cm, furfuraceous, base subcuneate to broadly cuneate, decurrent, margin with 1-3 pairs of undulate teeth, or entire, apex rounded to subobtuse. Inflorescences axillary glomerules borne toward apex of branches, forming small panicles. Fruiting bracts connate at base, semiorbicular, ca. 7 mm wide, basal central part swollen and hardened, margins green, with finely undulate teeth.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Description

Shrubs, semidioecious, mainly (15-)20-30 dm, with striated twigs. Leaves mostly alternate, short petiolate; blade broadly ovate, rhombic to suborbiculate, (15-)30-65 mm, about as wide, thick, base cuneate, margin sinuate-dentate, apex obtuse to rounded. Staminate flowers crowded in glomerules on short or elongate, interrupted spikes in large paniculate clusters to 20 cm. Pistillate flowers in dense, compound panicles, or axillary, or along staminate panicle branches. Fruiting bracteoles sessile, reticulately veined, rhombic to orbiculate, 5-12(-15) × 5-11 mm, papery all over or thick and corky, margin subentire to coarsely few-toothed. Seeds brown, 2 mm wide.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Diagnostic Description

Synonym

Atriplex johnstonii C. B. Wolf
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Type Information

Isotype for Atriplex johnstonii C.B. Wolf
Catalog Number: US 1699409
Collection: Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany
Verification Degree: Verified from the card file of type specimens
Preparation: Pressed specimen
Collector(s): C. B. Wolf
Year Collected: 1930
Locality: Playa del Ray, upper sonoran zone., Los Angeles, California, United States, North America
Elevation (m): 30 to 30
  • Isotype: Wolf, C. B. 1935. Occas. Pap. Rancho Santa Ana Bot. Gard. 1: 3.
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany

Source: National Museum of Natural History Collections

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Ecology

Habitat

Alluvial and sandy soils, naturalized.

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Bibliotheca Alexandrina

Source: Bibliotheca Alexandrina - EOL Ar

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Sandy coastal bluffs, disturbed sites such as roadsides; 0-2300m.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Habitat & Distribution

Naturalized. Taiwan (including Penghu Dao) [native to Australia].
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Life History and Behavior

Cyclicity

Flowering/Fruiting

Flowering summer-fall.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage: Atriplex nummularia

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 0
Specimens with Barcodes: 2
Species With Barcodes: 1
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© Barcode of Life Data Systems

Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Conservation

Conservation Status

National NatureServe Conservation Status

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: NNA - Not Applicable

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: GNR - Not Yet Ranked

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

National NatureServe Conservation Status

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: NNR - Unranked

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: GNR - Not Yet Ranked

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Wikipedia

Atriplex nummularia

Atriplex nummularia is a species of saltbush known by the common names old man saltbush, bluegreen saltbush, and giant saltbush. It is native to Australia, occurring in Western Australia, South Australia, the Northern Territory, Victoria, New South Wales, and Queensland.[1] It has been exported to other areas of the globe for various uses and was introduced to parts of the American desert southwest and northern Mexico, possibly for use as a soil stabilizer.[2] Domestic grazing animals will eat the sturdy shrub, which is adapted to arid environments with saline soils, so it is used as an animal forage in such habitats.[3] It is widely used as a forage crop in Tunisia[4] and Namibia.[5] The plant is generally palatable to grazing animals, but the palatability can be limited by the concentration of salt in the plant tissues as the plant takes in water from saline soils.[3][4]

A. nummularia is a grayish-white shrub growing to heights between 1.5 and 3 meters. The erect to spreading stems and twigs are scaly and striated. The thick leaves are oval to triangular, wavy and sometimes with dull teeth, and up to 6 or 7 centimeters long. The plant may be monoecious or dioecious. The male flowers are held in clusters or long spikes up to 20 centimeters long. The female flowers are held in the leaf axils or in terminal inflorescences, or sometimes are interspersed among the male clusters.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Atriplex nummularia". PlantNET - New South Wales Flora Online. Royal Botanic Gardens & Domain Trust, Sydney Australia. Retrieved 2008-12-12. 
  2. ^ Flora of North America
  3. ^ a b Aganga, A. A., et al. (2003). Atriplex nummularia (old man saltbush): A potential forage crop for arid regions of Botswana. Pakistan Journal of Nutrition 2:2 72-5.
  4. ^ a b FAO Animal Feed Resources
  5. ^ Rothauge, Axel (25 February 2014). "Staying afloat during a drought". The Namibian. 
Creative Commons Attribution Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-SA 3.0)

Source: Wikipedia

Unreviewed

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Notes

Comments

One of us (Clemants) observes that the above description does not correspond with that of Atriplex nummularia given by Wilson (in George, Fl. Australia 4: 130. 1984). Among the characters that are different are: herbs (Taiwan) vs. shrubs (Australia); leaves 1–1.5 cm (Taiwan) vs. leaves 2–4 cm (Australia). The species is included in Fl. Taiwan, ed. 2, but no specimen was seen by us. The plants in Taiwan might be an aberrant form of A. maximowicziana.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Comments

Atriplex nummularia is a rather coarse, broad-leaved, vigorous shrub, which has spread from some early introduction from Australia, possibly for use in stabilizing land.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Names and Taxonomy

Taxonomy

Comments: Accepted as a native species endemic to California by Kartesz (1999 floristic synthesis). Included by Munz (1968) in synonymy of the Australian species A. nummularia. Name misspelled 'johnsonii' in 1994 Kartesz checklist, corrected to 'johnstonii' in his 1999 floristic synthesis.

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Disclaimer

EOL content is automatically assembled from many different content providers. As a result, from time to time you may find pages on EOL that are confusing.

To request an improvement, please leave a comment on the page. Thank you!