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Overview

Brief Summary

Cumin (Cuminum cyminum) is probably native to Egypt, Central Asia, and the eastern Mediterranean region. Today it is grown in Iran, India, Morocco, China, Russia, Indonesia, Japan, and Turkey. It is used in curries, for pickling, for sauerkraut, in soups, and in stews. It is widely used in Latin America. (Vaughan and Geissler 1997)

Cumin is a member of the carrot family (Apiaceae or Umbelliferae). It is a small, slender, branching annual herb, around 30 cm tall. The leaves are divided into several thread-like segments up to 5 cm in length. The small white or pink flowers are borne in few-flowered umbels with thread-like bracts. The fruit is 4 to 8 mm in length and grayish green to dark gray in color. Black Cumin (Nigella sativa) is in an entirely different family (Ranunculaceae, the buttercup family). (Vaughan and Geissler 1997)

  • Vaughan, J.G. and C.A. Geissler. 1997. The New Oxford Book of Food Plants (revised and updated edition). Oxford University Press, New York.
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Comprehensive Description

Miscellaneous Details

"Notes: Plains to Evergreen Forests, Cultivated, Native of Mediterranean Region"
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Distribution

Maharashtra: Common throughout Karnataka: Hassan Tamil Nadu: All districts
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National Distribution

United States

Origin: Exotic

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Unknown/Undetermined

Confidence: Confident

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Distribution: North Africa, Mediterranean Region, Middle East, Central Asia, W. Pakistan; adventive in N. America.
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Localities documented in Tropicos sources

Cuminum cyminum L.:
Gabon (Africa & Madagascar)
India (Asia)
Kazakhstan (Asia)
Russian Federation (Asia)
United States (North America)
China (Asia)

Note: This information is based on publications available through Tropicos and may not represent the entire distribution. Tropicos does not categorize distributions as native or non-native.
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Physical Description

Morphology

Description

Plants slender, 15-30 cm tall, branched. Leaves much divided into filiform segments. Involucre of 5-6 linear, entire or ternate bracts with linear segments. Rays 3-6, 5 mm to 1 cm long. Involucel of long linear, white margined bractlets, 5-10 mm long. Calyx teeth prominent, acute, persistent. Petals rose coloured, unequal. Fruit oblong, 5-6 mm long, setulose; stylopodium conical; styles short, erect; vittae solitary under the secondary ridges; commissure 2-vittate
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Description

Plants 10–30(–50) cm. Basal petioles 1–2 cm, sheaths lanceolate, margins white and membranous; blade 3–8 × 2–7 cm; ultimate divisions long-filiform, 15–60 × 0.4–0.7 mm. Umbels many, 2–3 cm across; peduncles 3–10 cm; bracts 2–6(–8), linear or linear-lanceolate, 10–50 × 0.5–1.2 mm, unequal, entire or apex 2–3-fid, usually longer than the rays, margins membranous; rays (1–)3–6, 3–20 mm, rather stout, very unequal; bracteoles 3–5, similar to bracts, 4–10 × 0.3–0.6 mm, very unequal, sometimes reflexed; umbellules 3–8-flowered; pedicels 3–6 mm, stout, very unequal. Calyx teeth 0.5–2 mm, longer than the styles. Petals ca. 1.4 × 1 mm. Fruit 5–7 × 1.6–2.8 mm; primary ribs short setulose, secondary ribs densely stellate setulose. Fl. and fr. Feb–Jun(–Sep).
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Diagnostic Description

Diagnostic

Habit: Herb
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Ecology

Habitat

Habitat & Distribution

Cultivated. Xinjiang [possibly native to SW Asia and the Mediterranean region].
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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage: Cuminum cyminum

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 0
Specimens with Barcodes: 3
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Conservation

Conservation Status

National NatureServe Conservation Status

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: NNA - Not Applicable

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NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: GNR - Not Yet Ranked

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Relevance to Humans and Ecosystems

Benefits

Economic Uses

Uses: FOOD, Spice/herb/condiment

Comments: The dried fruit of Cumin cyminum is used as a condiment. It may be native to Turkestan upper Egypt.

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Wikipedia

Cumin

Cumin (/ˈkjuːmɨn/ or UK /ˈkʌmɨn/, US /ˈkmɨn/; sometimes spelled cummin; Cuminum cyminum) is a flowering plant in the family Apiaceae, native from the east Mediterranean to India. Its seeds (each one contained within a fruit, which is dried) are used in the cuisines of many different cultures, in both whole and ground form.

Etymology[edit]

The English "cumin" derives from the Old English cymen (or Old French cumin), from Latin cuminum,[2] which is the latinisation of the Greek κύμινον (kyminon),[3] cognate with Hebrew כמון (kammon) and Arabic كمون (kammun).[4] The earliest attested form of the word in Greek is the Mycenaean

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Notes

Comments

A species possibly indigenous to the upper Nile region in Egypt and cultivat¬ed in many places in the Mediterranean region and elsewhere. The fruit is used medicinally for digestive ailments and is also used as a spice
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Comments

The aromatic fruits (cumin) are used as a flavoring, to aid digestion, and are of reputed medicinal value. This species is widely cultivated in favorable climates outside its presumed native range. It readily escapes and becomes more or less naturalized locally in many areas.
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