Overview

Distribution

Dudleya farinosa occurs in (a) California (North Coast as well as the north and central portion of the Central Coast); (b) southwest Oregon

  • * Jepson Manual. 1993. Dudleya farinosa. University of California, Berkeley, Ca.
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Localities documented in Tropicos sources

Dudleya farinosa (Lindl.) Britton & Rose:
United States (North America)

Note: This information is based on publications available through Tropicos and may not represent the entire distribution. Tropicos does not categorize distributions as native or non-native.
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National Distribution

United States

Origin: Unknown/Undetermined

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Unknown/Undetermined

Confidence: Confident

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Physical Description

Type Information

Holotype for Dudleya compacta Rose
Catalog Number: US 431308
Collection: Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany
Verification Degree: Original publication and alleged type specimen examined
Preparation: Pressed specimen
Collector(s): A. Eastwood
Year Collected: 1903
Locality: San Francisco Bay., California, United States, North America
  • Holotype: Rose, J. N. 1903. Bull. New York Bot. Gard. 3: 25.
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Holotype for Dudleya septentrionalis Rose
Catalog Number: US 431375
Collection: Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany
Verification Degree: Original publication and alleged type specimen examined
Preparation: Pressed specimen
Collector(s): A. Eastwood
Year Collected: 1903
Locality: Crescent City., Del Norte, California, United States, North America
  • Holotype: Rose, J. N. 1903. Bull. New York Bot. Gard. 3: 26.
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Conservation

Conservation Status

NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: G5 - Secure

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National NatureServe Conservation Status

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: NNR - Unranked

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Wikipedia

Dudleya farinosa

Dudleya farinosa is a succulent plant known by several common names, including bluff lettuce, powdery liveforever, and powdery dudleya.

Contents

Distribution

This plant is native to the coastline of parts of Oregon and northern California,[1] where it is commonly found on bluffs and coastal hillsides. One specialized habitat in which D. farinosa is found is the Monterey Cypress forests at Point Lobos and Del Monte Forest in Monterey County, California.[2]

Description

This dudleya is variable in appearance from drab to spectacular. It grows from a branching caudex and forms a basal rosette of wide, pointed, spade-shaped leaves, each up to about six centimeters across.[3] The leaves are generally very pale green but they often have edges or tips of bright colors, particularly bright reds. The plant erects a tall stem which is pale green with pink or red tinting, atop which it bears a branching inflorescence with many pale to bright yellow flowers.

See also

Notes

  1. ^ C.Michael Hogan. 2010
  2. ^ C. Michael Hogan and Michael P. Frankis. 2009
  3. ^ Jepson Manual. 1993

References

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