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Overview

Brief Summary

Species Abstract

Dudleya cymosa (Lem.) Britt. & Rose is a perennial low-growing succulent plant species that is endemic to California. Having a number of subspecies, this fleshy plant is most frequently known as Canyon liveforever. This smooth leaved succulent taxon is quite often found among outcrops on rocky slopes in lower elevation mountains. Some of the subspecies are of highly restricted distribution, and most subspecies are associated with rather specific rock outcrop types as well as well defined mountain ranges. Elevations of occurrence vary from 50 to 2700 meters, with significant differentiation among some of the subspecies.

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Distribution

Dudleya cymosa is endemic to California. The California distribution includes the North Coast Ranges, Cascade Range, Sierra Nevada, Central Western California (except the Central Coast), and the Transverse Ranges. Each of the eight subspecies has a rather well defined geographic distribution, usually associated with specific canyons within one or more mountain ranges. Some of these subspecies distributions are highly restricted, leading to conservation designations of "rare" or "limited distribution" by the California Native Plant Society.

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National Distribution

United States

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

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Localities documented in Tropicos sources

Dudleya cymosa (Lem.) Britton & Rose:
United States (North America)

Note: This information is based on publications available through Tropicos and may not represent the entire distribution. Tropicos does not categorize distributions as native or non-native.
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Conservation

Conservation Status

NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: G5 - Secure

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National NatureServe Conservation Status

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: N5 - Secure

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Wikipedia

Dudleya cymosa

Dudleya cymosa is a succulent plant known by the common name canyon live-forever. The plant is found in rocky areas in the low elevations of California and southern Oregon mountains.

Description[edit]

It is a distinctive plant sending up erect red-orange stems from a gray-green basal rosette. The small yellowish-red thimble-shaped flowers top the stems in a cyme inflorescence. Some subspecies are considered threatened locally.

Subspecies[edit]

Selected Dudleya cymosa subspecies:

  • D. c. subsp. costafolia - Pierpoint Springs dudleya
  • D. c. subsp. crebrifolia - San Gabriel River dudleya
  • D. c. subsp. marcescens - marcescent dudleya
  • D. c. subsp. ovatifolia - Santa Monica Mountains dudleya

The subspecies marcescens[1] and ovatifolia[2] are federally listed as threatened species of the United States.

Butterfly habitat[edit]

Dudleya cymosa is the larval host plant for the Sonoran blue butterfly, Philotes sonorensis (Lycaenidae)

Basal rosette, erect stems, and inflorescences

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ USFWS. ssp. marcescens. Species Profile.
  2. ^ USFWS. ssp. ovatifolia. Species Profile.

References[edit]

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Names and Taxonomy

Taxonomy

Comments: This species is comprised of 7 or 8 subspecies (Kartesz 1999; Hickman 1993), some of which are rare.

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