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Overview

Distribution

National Distribution

United States

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

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Conservation

Conservation Status

National NatureServe Conservation Status

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: N5 - Secure

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NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: G5 - Secure

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Wikipedia

Dudleya cymosa

Dudleya cymosa is a succulent plant known by the common name canyon live-forever. The plant is found in rocky areas in the low elevations of California and southern Oregon mountains.

Description[edit]

It is a distinctive plant sending up erect red-orange stems from a gray-green basal rosette. The small yellowish-red thimble-shaped flowers top the stems in a cyme inflorescence. Some subspecies are considered threatened locally.

Subspecies[edit]

Selected Dudleya cymosa subspecies:

  • D. c. subsp. costafolia - Pierpoint Springs dudleya
  • D. c. subsp. crebrifolia - San Gabriel River dudleya
  • D. c. subsp. marcescens - marcescent dudleya
  • D. c. subsp. ovatifolia - Santa Monica Mountains dudleya

The subspecies marcescens[1] and ovatifolia[2] are federally listed as threatened species of the United States.

Butterfly habitat[edit]

Dudleya cymosa is the larval host plant for the Sonoran blue butterfly, Philotes sonorensis (Lycaenidae)

Basal rosette, erect stems, and inflorescences

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ USFWS. ssp. marcescens. Species Profile.
  2. ^ USFWS. ssp. ovatifolia. Species Profile.

References[edit]

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Names and Taxonomy

Taxonomy

Comments: This species is comprised of 7 or 8 subspecies (Kartesz 1999; Hickman 1993), some of which are rare.

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