Overview

Distribution

National Distribution

United States

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

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Global Range: Endemic to the San Gabriel Mountains, in Los Angeles County, California. The six known populations are found within a 16 square-mile area along the southern face of the mountains.

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Physical Description

Diagnostic Description

Leaf covered with mealy powder; styles 2-3 mm; pedicel greater than 2 mm; San Gabriel mountains.

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Ecology

Habitat

Comments: Steep rocky, granitic cliffs and canyon walls within chaparral, oak woodland, and riparian woodlands.

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Population Biology

Number of Occurrences

Note: For many non-migratory species, occurrences are roughly equivalent to populations.

Estimated Number of Occurrences: 1 - 5

Comments: Six known populations; one is historic.

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Life History and Behavior

Life Cycle

Persistence: PERENNIAL

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Conservation

Conservation Status

National NatureServe Conservation Status

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: N1 - Critically Imperiled

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NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: G1 - Critically Imperiled

Reasons: Endemic to San Gabriel Mountains of Los Angeles County, California. About 5 populations are known to be extant. A few historic populations have been destroyed by mining. Collecting and recreational use are ongoing threats. Formal protection is needed for all known sites.

Environmental Specificity: Very narrow. Specialist or community with key requirements scarce.

Comments: Only known from steep granite canyon walls in the San Gabriel Mts, California.

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Global Short Term Trend: Decline of 10-30%

Comments: Short term trend is declining due to the loss or degradation of plants on private lands which are mined.

Global Long Term Trend: Decline of 30-50%

Comments: The long term trend has been one of decline due to habitat loss; fortunately most of the sites are on public lands.

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Threats

Degree of Threat: High

Comments: A few historic populations have been destroyed by mining; road maintenance and habitat destruction. The sites on USFS lands have minor threats including collecting and recreational use.

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Management

Biological Research Needs: Beyond taxonomic work, not much is known. Any research would help.

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Wikipedia

Dudleya densiflora

Dudleya densiflora is a succulent plant known by the common name San Gabriel Mountains liveforever. This is a very rare plant which is endemic to the San Gabriel Mountains of Los Angeles County, California. It is known from only three to five spots in the mountain range and there are an estimated 1,700 individual plants remaining.

This plant grows in the cracks of the granite slopes of three canyons in this single mountain range, where it is threatened by human activity such as rock quarrying and off-trails hiking. Local studies are underway to gain information about this species.

Description[edit]

Dudleya densiflora is a unique plant, different in appearance from other dudleyas with its long, snakelike leaves. Each leaf is up to 15 centimeters long and cylindric up to its pointed tip, and it is covered with a soft, grainy powder. From this clump of leaves emerges an erect stem with a branched inflorescence, each branch bearing 2 to 8 light colored flowers, usually very light pink to white.

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