Overview

Distribution

National Distribution

United States

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

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Physical Description

Morphology

Description

Perennials, 60–100+ cm. Stems (from short caudices) single or multiple, sparsely branched distally, puberulent throughout. Leaves usually opposite (distal sometimes alternate, spreading or horizontal); sessile; blades pinnately nerved, elliptic or lance-ovate to narrowly ovate, 50–100 × 15–40 mm, bases rounded to cuneate (not connate-perfoliate), margins serrate, apices acute, faces puberulent or villous, gland-dotted. Heads in corymbiform arrays. Phyllaries 7–10 in 2–3 series, lanceolate (tapering at tips), 2–6 × 1–1.5 mm, apices acute, not mucronate, abaxial faces puberulent, gland-dotted. Florets (4–)5; corollas 3–3.5 mm. Cypselae 2–3 mm; pappi of 20–50 bristles 3.5–4.5 mm. 2n = 30, 40.
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Conservation

Conservation Status

National NatureServe Conservation Status

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: N4 - Apparently Secure

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NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: G4 - Apparently Secure

Reasons: Widespread but uncommon species of eastern USA.

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Threats

Comments: Moderately threatened by succession, and to a lesser extent by land-use conversion and habitat fragmentation, at least in Southern Appalachians (Southern Appalachian Species Viability Project 2002).

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Notes

Comments

Eupatorium godfreyanum is an apomictic polyploid derivative that includes genomes from E. rotundifolium and E. sessilifolium. Although it is relatively narrow in distribution, it is known to occur in localities where both progenitor species are absent and it seems to be persistent where it occurs. Eupatorium vaseyi Porter has been misapplied to E. godfreyanum.
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Names and Taxonomy

Taxonomy

Comments: Described in 1985 (Brittonia 37: 238-240), type locality in Virginia (fide IPNI, 2001). Resembles E. sessilifolium, but more pubescent; the name E. vaseyi has been misapplied to these plants (Gleason & Cronquist, 1991).

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