Overview

Distribution

National Distribution

United States

Origin: Unknown/Undetermined

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Unknown/Undetermined

Confidence: Confident

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Global Range: It occurs in the Arizona Desert, the upper edge of Colorado Desert, and in Sonora, Mexico.

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Range Description

This species occurs in Arizona (United States), Sonora, and Baja California Sur (Mexico), at elevations of 0-1,200m asl.
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Ariz.; Mexico (Sonora).
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Physical Description

Morphology

Description

Stems erect, spheric to ovoid-cylindric, 30-90(-250) × 30-60(-100) cm; ribs (15-)21-32, shallowly notched immediately above each areole. Spines 6-10 per areole, reddish, reddish gray, or horn colored, all robust and rigid, more than 1 mm diam.; central spine 1, curved (hooked only on relatively young plants), annulate, thick, adaxially flat, 55-95(-130) × 2.5-4 mm. Flowers reddish outside, brilliant red inside, 6-7.5 × 5-7.5 cm; inner tepals brilliant red [yellow]; stigma lobes brilliant red. Fruits ± readily dehiscent through basal pore, bright yellow, 25-50 × 25-35 mm, leathery or fleshy, locule dry, hollow except for seeds. Seeds 2 mm, pitted. 2n = 22.
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Diagnostic Description

Synonym

Echinocactus emoryi Engelmann, Proc. Amer. Acad. Arts 3: 275. 1856; Ferocactus covillei Britton & Rose
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Type Information

Lectotype for Ferocactus covillei Britton & Rose
Catalog Number: US 795801
Collection: Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany
Verification Degree: ; Original publication and alleged type specimen examined
Preparation: Pressed specimen
Collector(s): C. G. Pringle
Year Collected: 1884
Locality: Mexico, Central America
  • Lectotype: Britton, N. L. & Rose, J. N. 1922. Cactaceae. 3: 132.; Benson, L. D. 1982. Cacti U.S. Canada. 950.
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Ecology

Habitat

Comments: Rocky hills and sandy or rocky flats (including wash margins, alluvial fans, and mesas) in the Arizona Desert and the upper edge of the Colorado Desert. Rocks are often limestone with a black patina or black lava or basalt. Occurs mostly between 450 and 915 m elevation in Arizona but at least 1 Sonoran population occurs at sea level.

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Habitat and Ecology

Habitat and Ecology
The species occurs in the Sonoran Desert (Paredes et al. 2000), in rocky hills and sandy or rocky flats (including wash margins, alluvial fans, and mesas), in the Arizona Desert and the upper edge of the Colorado Desert. Rocks are often limestone with a black patina or black lava or basalt.

Systems
  • Terrestrial
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Hillsides, wash margins, alluvial fans, mesas, or flats, gravelly rocky or sandy soils, rocky slopes and adjacent bajadas, Sonoran desert scrub, igneous substrates; 0-1200m.
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Population Biology

Number of Occurrences

Note: For many non-migratory species, occurrences are roughly equivalent to populations.

Estimated Number of Occurrences: 6 - 20

Comments: Ten EO's (Benson 1982).

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General Ecology

Ferocactus species are likely to utilize nurse plants for favorable microhabitat conditions early in development.

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Life History and Behavior

Cyclicity

Flowering/Fruiting

Flowering summer-early fall.
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Reproduction

All Ferocactus species produce fleshy-fruits which are consumed and dispersed by animals (Valiente-Banuet and Godinez-Alvarez 2002).

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Conservation

Conservation Status

National NatureServe Conservation Status

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: NNR - Unranked

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NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: G4 - Apparently Secure

Reasons: About 10 occurrences are known, all from south-central Arizona and adjacent northern Sonora, Mexico.

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IUCN Red List Assessment


Red List Category
LC
Least Concern

Red List Criteria

Version
3.1

Year Assessed
2013

Assessor/s
Burquez Montijo, A.

Reviewer/s
Superina, M. & Goettsch, B.K.

Contributor/s

Justification
Ferocactus emoryi is widespread, with no evidence of systematic decline, and occurs in several protected areas. Hence, it is listed as Least Concern.
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Population

Population
The species is widespread and locally prominent. The population is presently stable, although past reductions in distribution have occurred due to land use change (through ranching)

Population Trend
Stable
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Threats

Comments: Most cacti subject to horticultural collecting.

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Major Threats
Land conversion is a concern in the lowlands, but the species also occurs at high elevations where this is not the case.
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Management

Conservation Actions

Conservation Actions
This cactus grows in some protected areas, such as Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument and the Biosphere Reserves Pinacate and El Vizcaíno.
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Wikipedia

Ferocactus emoryi

Ferocactus emoryi, known commonly as Emory's Barrel Cactus, Coville’s barrel cactus and Traveler's Friend, is a barrel cactus in the genus Ferocactus.

Description[edit]

This specimen in the Brooklyn Botanic Garden is labeled "Fishhook Cactus"

Ferocactus emoryi is spherical or cylindrical solitary barrel cactus, light green to glaucous, reaching a diameter of 60–100 centimetres (24–39 in) and a height of 2–2.5 metres (6 ft 7 in–8 ft 2 in). It has 15 to 30 ribs with tubercles, especially in the juvenile stage. The spines are white to reddish. The central spine is very strong, 4-10 cm long, while the seven to twelve radial spines reach lengths of up to 6 cm. The large and funnel-shaped flowers are usually red or yellow, reach lengths of up to 7.5 centimeters and have a diameter of 5 to 7 centimeters. The fruit is ovoidal, about 5 cm long.

Distribution[edit]

This species is found in nature in Mexico (Sonora, Sinaloa and Baja California Sur) and in the United States (Arizona).

Habitat[edit]

Ferocactus emoryi grows in the desert scrubs, hillsides, rocky slopes and gravely rocky or sandy soils, at an elevation of about 0–1,200 metres (0–3,937 ft) above sea level.

Subspecies[edit]

References[edit]



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Notes

Comments

Ferocactus emoryi has a confused taxonomic history. The name is based on Echinocactus emoryi, which was published twice by Engelmann, each involving a different species. Engelmann’s first use of E. emoryi [in W. H. Emory]---applied to a population of Ferocactus wislizeni in eastern Arizona---is rejected as provisional and therefore invalid. However, Engelmann’s second use of E. emoryi was a valid publication, and it unambigously pertains to the species in southwestern Arizona that Britton and Rose unncecessarily re-named as Ferocactus covillei.
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