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Overview

Comprehensive Description

Description

Annual herb to 30 cm. Leaves mostly simple, entire, oblanceolate. Flowers in fragrant, many-flowered, conical, terminal racemes; bracts persistent. Sepals 6. Petals 1.5-2.5 mm, yellow, 6 with numerous small lobes. Fruit pendulous, oblong, rugose.
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© Mark Hyde, Bart Wursten and Petra Ballings

Source: Flora of Zimbabwe

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Derivation of specific name

odorata: odorous, fragrant
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© Mark Hyde, Bart Wursten and Petra Ballings

Source: Flora of Zimbabwe

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Distribution

Localities documented in Tropicos sources

Reseda odorata L.:
Canada (North America)
Chile (South America)
Guatemala (Mesoamerica)
Honduras (Mesoamerica)
United States (North America)
China (Asia)

Note: This information is based on publications available through Tropicos and may not represent the entire distribution. Tropicos does not categorize distributions as native or non-native.
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© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

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Worldwide distribution

Native of Egypt and Cyrenaica; naturalised elsewhere.
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© Mark Hyde, Bart Wursten and Petra Ballings

Source: Flora of Zimbabwe

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National Distribution

United States

Origin: Exotic

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Unknown/Undetermined

Confidence: Confident

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© NatureServe

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Distribution: A native of N. Africa and naturalised in E. & C. Europe.
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© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

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Physical Description

Morphology

Description

An erect to decumbent annual, up to 45 cm tall. Stem glabrous to pilose. Leaves 2.5-7 cm long, 1.5-2.5 cm broad; lower leaves entire, lanceolate to elliptic, the upper ternate, with a large median lobe; midrib and veins pilose. Flowers fragrant, yellowish-white, in axillary and terminal racemes, up to 50 cm long; bracts c. 3 mm long, linear. Pedicel 6-7 mm long. Sepals 2-3 mm long, lanceolate to subulate, unequal. Posterior petal 9-13-lobed; appendage c. the size of the petal or larger, suborbiculate, margin fimbriate. Capsule subglobose. Seeds black, glaucous.
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© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

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Description

Herbs usually annual, to 40 cm tall, glabrous. Stem branched. Leaves subsessile, spatulate or lanceolate to elliptic-oblong, entire or toothed to parted, papery. Flowers in terminal racemes; white or light yellow, or orange-red when cultivated, very fragrant. Sepals 6, narrowly spatulate, 2.5-4 mm, shorter than pedicel. Petals 6, clawed at base, lower 2 entire, lateral 2 digitate, upper 2 digitate with few segments and equaling sepals. Stamens 17-20; filaments subulate. Carpels 3. Capsule pendulous, subglobose or urceolate, 3-angled, ca. 1 cm. Seeds black, shiny, 2-2.5 mm; testa rugose. 2n = 12.
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© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA

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Ecology

Habitat

Habitat & Distribution

Cultivated for ornament. Shanghai Shi, Taiwan, Zhejiang (Hangzhou Shi) [native to S Greece (Gavdos Island) and NE Libya; widely cultivated and naturalized elsewhere].
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© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

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Associations

In Great Britain and/or Ireland:
Foodplant / spot causer
amphigenous colony of Cercospora dematiaceous anamorph of Cercospora resedae causes spots on live leaf of Reseda odorata

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Population Biology

Frequency

Rare?
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© Mark Hyde, Bart Wursten and Petra Ballings

Source: Flora of Zimbabwe

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Life History and Behavior

Cyclicity

Flower/Fruit

Fl. Per.: April-May.
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© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA

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Conservation

Conservation Status

National NatureServe Conservation Status

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: NNA - Not Applicable

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NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: GNR - Not Yet Ranked

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Wikipedia

Reseda odorata

Reseda odorata is a species of flowering plant in the reseda family known by many common names, including garden mignonette and common mignonette. It is probably native to the Mediterranean Basin, but it can sometimes be found growing in the wild as an introduced species in many parts of the world.[1] These introductions are often garden escapees; the plant has long been kept as an ornamental plant for its fragrant flowers, the essential oil of which has been used in perfumes.[1] This is an annual herb producing branching erect stems to 80 centimeters in maximum height. The inflorescence is a spikelike raceme of many flowers. The fragrant flower has six white to yellowish or greenish petals, the upper ones each divided into three narrow, fingerlike lobes. At the center of the flower are up to about 25 stamens tipped with large dangling orange anthers.

References[edit]

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Notes

Comments

Commonly known as “sweet mignonette” and cultivated for its strongly fragrant flowers. Several varieties are recognised. The plant parts are used for the alleviation of pain and relief from irritation. It yields an oil which is used for the manufacture of cosmetics.
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