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Overview

Comprehensive Description

Miscellaneous Details

"Notes: Western Ghats, Cultivated, Native of Tropical America"
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Miscellaneous Details

"Notes: Western Ghats, Cultivated, Native Tropical America"
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Distribution

National Distribution

United States

Origin: Exotic

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Unknown/Undetermined

Confidence: Confident

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Tamil Nadu: Nilgiri
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Tamil Nadu: Dindigul
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Physical Description

Diagnostic Description

Diagnostic

Habit: Shrub
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Diagnostic

Habit: Subshrub
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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Barcode data: Heliotropium arborescens

The following is a representative barcode sequence, the centroid of all available sequences for this species.


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Statistics of barcoding coverage: Heliotropium arborescens

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 1
Specimens with Barcodes: 1
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Conservation

Conservation Status

National NatureServe Conservation Status

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: NNA - Not Applicable

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NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: GNR - Not Yet Ranked

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Wikipedia

Heliotropium arborescens

The Garden Heliotrope (Heliotropium arborescens) is a highly fragrant perennial plant, originally from Peru.[2] It is especially notable for its intense, rather vanilla-like fragrance. Common names include cherry pie and "common heliotrope". Note that the common name "garden heliotrope" may also refer to Valerian (herb), which is not a heliotropium variety.

During the Victorian era in England this plant gained great recognition, often appearing in gardens and the herbaceous borders of parks. Its popularity may have become less in more modern times, but hardy and colourful varieties, such as 'Princess Marina', have ensured that this plant still regularly appears in seed catalogues and garden centres. Other popular varieties include, 'Mary Fox', the highly scented 'White Lady' or 'White Queen' and a taller variety 'Florence Nightingale'. A vanilla-scented heliotrope was laid on the coffin of Emily Dickinson[3]

The ASPCA's Animal Poison Control Center article on heliotropes lists them as a substance which is toxic to horses and can induce liver failure in equines: The plant is not very palatable, but will be eaten by animals with no other forage; poisonings typically occur from ingestion of green plant material or material in hay. The toxic components can cause liver failure, referred to as "walking disease" or "sleepy staggers". Signs include weight loss, weakness, sleepiness, yawning, incoordination, yellowish discoloration to mucous membranes (icterus), neurologic problems secondary to liver failure (aimless walking, chewing motions, head pressing). Animals may appear to be normal at first, then become suddenly affected; the syndrome progresses rapidly over a few days to a week

Gallery[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "The Plant List: A Working List of All Plant Species". Retrieved 26 July 2014. 
  2. ^ http://www.pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Heliotropium+arborescens
  3. ^ http://www.telegraph.co.uk/gardening/3343213/New-feet-within-my-garden-go.html


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