Overview

Distribution

National Distribution

United States

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

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Global Range: Endemic to Colorado; known from Lake, Park, and Summit counties. Estimated range is 284 square kilometers (110 square miles), calculated in GIS by drawing a minimum convex polygon around the known occurrences.

From Steve Olson (USFS Pike San Isabel) 2012: Ipomopsis globularis is known from three counties in central Colorado. All are within a 20 by 30 mile area in the Mosquito range.

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Physical Description

Type Information

Isotype for Gilia globularis Brand in Engl.
Catalog Number: US 58499
Collection: Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany
Verification Degree: Card file verified by examination of alleged type specimen
Preparation: Pressed specimen
Collector(s): E. Hall & J. Harbour
Year Collected: 1862
Locality: Rocky Mts., Colorado, United States, North America
  • Isotype: Brand, A. 1907. Pflanzenr. 27: 120.
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Ecology

Habitat

Comments: Alpine ridgetops with gravelly, calcareous soils. 3660-4270 m elevation.

From Steve Olson (USFS Pike San Isabel) 2012: Ipomopsis globularis is found on alpine ridges with gravelly, calcareous soil. Habitats are described as meadows, talus, and scree slopes, often with 50 percent bare soil. Plants have been seen on abandoned mine spoils (pers. obs. S. Olson). Sites are underlain by Leadville limestone and Manitou limestone formations (Panjabi and Anderson 2005). Populations occur on all aspects and flat to very steep slopes. Frequently associated species of Ipomopsis globularis include Geum rossii, Artemisia scopulorum, Bistorta bistortoides, Campanula uniflora, Castilleja occidentalis, Deschampsia cespitosa, Elymus trachycaulus, Lloydia serotina, Oxytropis splendens, Pedicularis scopulorum, Polemonium viscosum, and Silene acaulis (Panjabi and Anderson 2005).

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Population Biology

Number of Occurrences

Note: For many non-migratory species, occurrences are roughly equivalent to populations.

Estimated Number of Occurrences: 6 - 20

Comments: There are 9 principal occurrences documented in the Colorado Natural Heritage Program database. 5 of the 9 occurrences have not been observed in over 20 years. The USFS Conservation Assessment also documents 9 occurrences (Spackman Panjabi and Anderson 2005).

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Life History and Behavior

Reproduction

The species may be self-incompatible, requiring cross-fertilization (Panjabi and Anderson 2005). Numbers in populations that have been revisited appear to vary with the local weather conditions. Seeds are likely to be dispersed by wind and water (Panjabi and Anderson 2005).

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Conservation

Conservation Status

National NatureServe Conservation Status

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: N2 - Imperiled

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NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: G2 - Imperiled

Reasons: The species' geographic range is limited to high elevations in the Mosquito Range and the Hoosier Ridge area of the Colorado Rocky Mountains. There are nine document occurrences, four with good or excellent viability. Motorized recreation is rapidly increasing in areas where this species grows. Mining claims exist throughout the range of Ipomopsis globularis and, although most are not currently active, they represent a potential threat to the species.

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Global Short Term Trend: Unknown

Comments: There are no quantitative data available to infer the population trend of Ipomopsis globularis (Spackman Panjabi and Anderson 2005). Loss of habitat and anthropogenic disturbance of habitat has probably caused a downward trend since the area was settled approximately 140 years ago (Spackman Panjabi and Anderson 2005).

Global Long Term Trend: Unknown

Comments: Unknown.

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Threats

Degree of Threat: High

Comments: The primary threat at this time is considered to be motorized recreation (Rondeau et al. 2011). Other potential threats are from mining, exotic species invasion, effects of small population size, collection for horticultural trade, non-motorized recreation, global climate change, and pollution. Motorized recreation is rapidly increasing in areas where this species grows, and it is extremely difficult to enforce regulations or to close access to protect populations. The entire global range of I. globularis is vulnerable to mining development; however, the scale and time frame within which mining activity might occur is unknown. Historic mining is widely evident in this species' habitat. Land ownership patterns are extremely complex within the range of I. globularis and even within individual occurrences. Despite its narrow range, this species is found on lands administered by three ranger districts on two national forests (South Park and Leadville of the Pike-San Isabel, and Dillon of the Arapaho as administered by the White River), and hundreds if not thousands of private landowners. These complex land ownership patterns make conservation efforts difficult. (Spackman Panjabi and Anderson 2005).

From Steve Olson (USFS Pike San Isabel) 2012: Threats to Ipomopsis globularis may include unregulated recreation (motorized and non-motorized), collecting (for rock-gardens), mining, non-native invasive species, pollution, and climate change (NatureServe 2012, Panjabi and Anderson 2005). All or part of one large population is protected by the Hoosier Ridge Research Natural Area. This species appears to be somewhat tolerant of disturbance.

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Wikipedia

Ipomopsis globularis

Ipomopsis globularis is a species of flowering plant in the phlox family known by the common name Hoosier Pass ipomopsis. It is endemic to Colorado in the United States, where it grows in the Rocky Mountains.[1]

This plant is a perennial herb. The leaves are mostly located around the base of the plant. A spherical inflorescence of pinkish or bluish white flowers over one centimeter in diameter is borne atop a woolly stem up to about 6 inches in height. The flowers are fragrant.[2]

This plant is found only in and around the Mosquito Range of the Rocky Mountains, for example, in the Hoosier Pass.[2] Its habitat is in the alpine climate of mountain ridges up to 4270 meters in elevation. It grows in calcareous soils.[1] The plants grow in meadows and on talus slopes. The land is flat to sloping.[2]

The worst threat to this species is probably motorized recreation in the habitat, such as off-road vehicles and snowmobiles. This activity has increased recently as the nearby population has increased. Mining may be a minor current threat, but mining activity has decreased in the area. Introduced species of plants pose a potential threat.[2]

References

  1. ^ a b Ipomopsis globularis. NatureServe.
  2. ^ a b c d Panjabi, S.S. and D.G. Anderson (2005, March 15). Ipomopsis globularis (Brand) W.A. Weber (Hoosier Pass ipomopsis): a technical conservation assessment. [Online]. USDA Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Region.
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