Overview

Distribution

Localities documented in Tropicos sources

Nuphar lutea (L.) Sm.:
Russian Federation (Asia)
China (Asia)
Kazakhstan (Asia)

Note: This information is based on publications available through Tropicos and may not represent the entire distribution. Tropicos does not categorize distributions as native or non-native.
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Localities documented in Tropicos sources

Nuphar luteum Sibth. & Sm.:
China (Asia)
United States (North America)

Note: This information is based on publications available through Tropicos and may not represent the entire distribution. Tropicos does not categorize distributions as native or non-native.
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Physical Description

Morphology

Description

Rhizomes stout, 3--8 cm in diam. Petiole ca. 50 cm, glabrous; floating leaf blade elliptic, 15--30 × 10--22 cm, leathery, abaxially glabrous or pubescent, adaxially glabrous, base cordate and basal lobes spreading. Flower 4--5 cm in diam. Peduncle to ca. 50 cm, glabrous. Sepals yellow, broadly ovate to orbicular, 2--3 cm. Petals linear, 1--1.5 cm, apex truncate to rounded. Anthers yellow, 4--7 mm. Stigmatic disc entire,7--19 mm in diam., rays 5--25. Fruit ca. 2.5 cm in diam. Seeds olive green, ovoid, ca. 5 mm. Fl. Jul--Aug. 2n = 34.
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Diagnostic Description

Synonym

Nymphaea lutea Linnaeus, Sp. Pl. 1: 510. 1753.
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Type Information

Isolectotype for Nymphaea macrophylla Small
Catalog Number: US 228128
Collection: Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany
Verification Degree: Original publication and alleged type specimen examined
Preparation: Pressed specimen
Collector(s): G. V. Nash
Year Collected: 1894
Locality: Vicinity of Eustis., Lake, Florida, United States, North America
  • Isolectotype: Small, J. K. 1898. Bull. Torrey Bot. Club. 25: 465.; Miller, G. & Standley, P. C. 1912. Contr. U.S. Natl. Herb. 16: 89.
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Ecology

Habitat

Habitat & Distribution

Lakes and ponds. Xinjiang [Kazakhstan, Russia (Siberia); Africa, SW Asia, Europe].
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Associations

Flower-Visiting Insects of Spatterdock in Illinois

Nuphar advena (Spatterdock)
(Short-tongued bees collect pollen, while flies feed on pollen; Robertson doesn't describe it as such, but Lasioglossum nelumbonis is probably oligolectic on species of the Water Lily family; observations are from Robertson)

Bees (short-tongued)
Halictidae (Halictinae): Lasioglossum nelumbonis cp olg

Flies
Syrphidae: Parhelophilus divisus fp

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Foodplant / open feeder
adult of Donacia crassipes grazes on leaf (upper surface) of Nuphar lutea
Remarks: season: end 5-7(-8)

Foodplant / feeds on
adult of Donacia dentata feeds on pollen? of Nuphar lutea
Remarks: season: (3-)5-8
Other: uncertain

Foodplant / feeds on
adult of Donacia sparganii feeds on pollen of Nuphar lutea
Remarks: Other: uncertain

Foodplant / open feeder
adult of Galerucella nymphaeae grazes on live leaf of Nuphar lutea

In Great Britain and/or Ireland:
Foodplant / miner
often gregarious larva of Hydromyza livens mines live leaf of Nuphar lutea
Remarks: season: summer
Other: major host/prey

Plant / resting place / on
adult of Plateumaris sericea may be found on flower of Nuphar lutea
Remarks: season: (1-)6(-12)

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Life History and Behavior

Life Cycle

Persistence: PERENNIAL

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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Barcode data: Nuphar lutea

The following is a representative barcode sequence, the centroid of all available sequences for this species.


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Statistics of barcoding coverage: Nuphar lutea

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 6
Specimens with Barcodes: 8
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Conservation

Conservation Status

NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: G5 - Secure

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Wikipedia

Nuphar lutea

Nuphar lutea (Yellow Water-lily, Brandy-Bottle) is an aquatic plant of the family Nymphaeaceae, native to temperate regions of Europe, northwest Africa, and western Asia.[1][2]

Ecology[edit]

This aquatic plant grows in shallow water and wetlands, with its roots in the sediment and its leaves floating on the water surface; it can grow in water up to 5 metres deep.[3] It is usually found in shallower water than the white water lily, and often in beaver ponds. Since the flooded soils are deficient in oxygen, aerenchyma in the leaves and rhizome transport oxygen to the rhizome. Often there is mass flow from the young leaves into the rhizome, and out through the older leaves.[4] The rhizomes are often consumed by muskrats. The flower is solitary, terminal, held above the water surface; it is hermaphrodite, 2–4 cm diameter, with five or six large bright yellow sepals and numerous small yellow petals largely concealed by the sepals. Flowering is from June to September, and pollination is entomophilous, by flies attracted to the alcoholic scent.[3] The flower is followed by a green bottle-shaped fruit, containing numerous seeds which are dispersed by water currents. The species is less tolerant of water pollution than water-lilies in the genus Nymphaea.[3]

Taxonomy[edit]

Some botanists have treated Nuphar lutea as the sole species in Nuphar, including all the other species in it as subspecies and giving the species a holarctic range,[5][6] but the genus is now more usually divided into eight species (see Nuphar for details).[7]

Symbolism[edit]

Flag of Frisia

Stylized red leaves of the yellow water lily, known as pompeblêden are used as a symbol of Frisia. The flag of the Dutch province of Friesland features seven pompeblêden.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Flora Europaea: Nuphar lutea
  2. ^ USDA Germplasm Resources Information Network: Nuphar lutea
  3. ^ a b c Blamey, M. & Grey-Wilson, C. (1989). Flora of Britain and Northern Europe. ISBN 0-340-40170-2
  4. ^ Dacey, J. W. H. (1981). Pressurized ventilation in the yellow water lily. Ecology, 62, 1137–47.
  5. ^ Beal, E. O. (1956). Taxonomic revision of the genus Nuphar Sm. of North America and Europe. Journal of the Elisha Mitchell Scientific Society 72: 317–346.
  6. ^ "Plants Profile: Nuphar lutea". Natural Resources Conservation Service. United States Department of Agriculture. Retrieved 13 April 2010. 
  7. ^ USDA Germplasm Resources Information Network: Nuphar
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Names and Taxonomy

Taxonomy

Comments: The taxonomic classification of the yellow pond-lilies (Nuphar) is currently unsettled; see the discussion by Wiersema and Hellquist (Flora of North America, vol. 3, 1997). Nuphar lutea was named from Europe, and is considered by some, including Beal (1956, J. Elisha Mitchell Sci. Soc. 72: 317-346) and Kartesz (checklist, 1994, and review draft checklist 8/98) to include as subspecies several North American taxa. On the other hand, the North American plants are often treated as several species instead (as by Wiersema and Hellquist in FNA). Appropriate nomenclatural combinations have not been made to allow treatment of the North American plants as subspecies of a North American species (excluding the European species Nuphar lutea). The Kartesz treatment is followed here, with synonymy provided for the names in FNA. Also, the gender of the generic name Nuphar has been debated; although often treated as neuter, it is considered feminine, with endings of scientific names corrected as needed. As treated here, Nuphar lutea ssp. lutea is a plant of Europe, Asia eastward to Manchuria and central Siberia, and southward to Algeria, Palestine, and Iran.

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