Overview

Distribution

National Distribution

United States

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

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Global Range: Is largely restricted to the Appalachian Mountains of North Carolina, although known from a few localities in Georgia and South Carolina (Barker and Cheek 1994).

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Ecology

Habitat

Comments: Found in seepage areas of granite outcrops (Barker and Cheek 1994).

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Conservation

Conservation Status

National NatureServe Conservation Status

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: N3 - Vulnerable

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NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: G3 - Vulnerable

Reasons: Hypericum buckleii is an attractive alpine or rock plant that is endemic to the high peaks of the southern Appalachians. The plant is widely cultivated but rare as a naturally occurring species. Although known from less than five localities in Georgia and one in South Carolina, the St. John's wort is largely restricted to the Appalachian Mountains of North Carolina. Some populations are impacted by hickers on trails.

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Threats

Comments: In Georgia, the populations are not under immediate threat, except along recreational trails, such as the Appalachian Trail over Blood Mountain where pedestrian impacts limit its spread (Patrick, 1999). Hypericum buckleii is a narrow endemic, putting it at risk to catastrophic disturbance, such as may occur through trampling, rock slides, or natural exfoliation (Southern Appalachian Species Viability Project 2002).

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Names and Taxonomy

Taxonomy

Comments: Spelling of epithet revised from the widely used 'buckleyi' to 'buckleii' (as used by Kartesz, 1/98 review draft dataset) to conform to author's original latinization of 'Buckley' (see discussion by R.L. Wilbur, Castanea 60: 166-167, 1995).

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