Overview

Brief Summary

History in the United States

Linden viburnum was introduced in the early 1800s as an ornamental.

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Distribution

Distribution and Habitat in the United States

It occurs in scattered locations throughout the mid-Atlantic region from New York to Virginia and has been reported to be invasive in natural areas in Virginia. It grows in disturbed forests and wetlands.

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Origin

Korea and eastern Asia

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Localities documented in Tropicos sources

Viburnum dilatatum Thunb.:
Japan (Asia)
North Korea (Asia)
South Korea (Asia)
China (Asia)

Note: This information is based on publications available through Tropicos and may not represent the entire distribution. Tropicos does not categorize distributions as native or non-native.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

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Localities documented in Tropicos sources

Viburnum brevipes Rehder:
China (Asia)

Note: This information is based on publications available through Tropicos and may not represent the entire distribution. Tropicos does not categorize distributions as native or non-native.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

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Localities documented in Tropicos sources

Viburnum dilatatum var. fulvotomentosum (P.S. Hsu) P.S. Hsu:
China (Asia)

Note: This information is based on publications available through Tropicos and may not represent the entire distribution. Tropicos does not categorize distributions as native or non-native.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

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Localities documented in Tropicos sources

Viburnum dilatatum Thunb.:
China (Asia)
South Korea (Asia)
Japan (Asia)

Note: This information is based on publications available through Tropicos and may not represent the entire distribution. Tropicos does not categorize distributions as native or non-native.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

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National Distribution

United States

Origin: Exotic

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Unknown/Undetermined

Confidence: Confident

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© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

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Physical Description

Morphology

Description and Biology

  • Plant: scruffy multi-stemmed deciduous shrub, upright to rounded, 8-10 ft. tall by 6-10 ft. across.
  • Leaves: opposite, dark green, shiny, with shallowly toothed margins, nearly round to straplike, 2-5 in. long by 1-2½ in. wide; usually covered in soft hairs; leaves drop relatively late in the fall.
  • Flowers, fruits and seeds: small creamy white flowers in numerous flattened clusters 3-5 in. wide; May to early June; fruits are bright red, flattened spheres, about 1/3 in. wide.
  • Spreads: by seed that is consumed and spread by birds.
  • Look-alikes: other viburnums and other opposite-leaved shrubs.

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Type Information

Isotype for Viburnum brevipes Rehder in Sarg.
Catalog Number: US 598257
Collection: Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany
Verification Degree: Original publication and alleged type specimen examined
Preparation: Pressed specimen
Collector(s): E. H. Wilson
Year Collected: 1907
Locality: Western Hupeh., Hupeh, China, Asia-Temperate
  • Isotype: Rehder, A. 1911. Pl. Wilson. 1: 113.
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© Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany

Source: National Museum of Natural History Collections

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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage: Viburnum dilatatum

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 0
Specimens with Barcodes: 35
Species With Barcodes: 1
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© Barcode of Life Data Systems

Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

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Conservation

Conservation Status

National NatureServe Conservation Status

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: NNA - Not Applicable

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Source: NatureServe

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NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: GNR - Not Yet Ranked

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Source: NatureServe

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Management

Prevention and Control

Do not plant linden viburnum. Cutting should be avoided in spring because cut branches can reproduce by layering (when a new plant forms from development of roots on a stem attached to the parent plant). Use of a systemic herbicide containing glyphosate or triclopyr will prevent resprouting. Seedlings can be pulled up by hand. Seed heads should be removed from mature plants to prevent seed dispersal and seedling establishment.

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Relevance to Humans and Ecosystems

Risks

Ecological Threat in the United States

Shrubs can grow over 15 ft. high in thickets that cast dense shade, suppressing native shrubs, small trees and herbaceous vegetation. A dense cover of young plants produced from seed and vegetative re-growth often blankets the ground in infested areas. Linden viburnum leafs out earlier in the spring and keeps its leaves later into the fall than most native vegetation, giving it a competitive advantage.

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Disclaimer

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