Overview

Distribution

National Distribution

United States

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

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National Distribution

United States

Origin: Unknown/Undetermined

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Unknown/Undetermined

Confidence: Confident

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Physical Description

Morphology

Description

Perennials, 50–180 cm (rhizomes stout, plants not colonial, roots fibrous). Leaves green, blades lanceolate to ovate or elliptic, herbaceous, sometimes pinnately lobed, bases attenuate, ultimate margins entire or coarsely toothed, apices acute, faces (abaxial) sparsely hairy or glabrous (adaxial); basal petiolate, 20–60 × 5–15 cm; cauline petiolate or sessile, 10–30 × 3–15 cm. Heads borne singly or (3–12) in ± corymbiform arrays. Phyllaries to 2 cm. Receptacles conic to columnar; paleae 5–6 mm, apices obtuse to acute, abaxial tips densely hairy. Ray florets 8–21; laminae linear to elliptic or oblong, 3–6 × 1–1.6 cm, abaxially hairy. Discs 15–60 × 14–25 mm. Disc florets 200–300+; corollas greenish yellow, 4–5 mm; style branches ca. 1.5 mm, apices acute to rounded. Cypselae 4–5 mm; pappi coroniform or of scales, to 1.5 mm. 2n = 36.
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Type Information

Isotype for Rudbeckia californica A. Gray
Catalog Number: US 323705
Collection: Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany
Verification Degree: Card file verified by examination of alleged type specimen
Preparation: Pressed specimen
Collector(s): H. N. Bolander
Year Collected: 1866
Locality: Yosemite National Park, near Big Tree Grove., California, United States, North America
  • Isotype: Gray, A. 1868. Proc. Amer. Acad. Arts. 7: 357.
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Isotype for Rudbeckia californica A. Gray
Catalog Number: US 26539
Collection: Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany
Verification Degree: Card file verified by examination of alleged type specimen
Preparation: Pressed specimen
Collector(s): H. N. Bolander
Year Collected: 1866
Locality: Mariposa Sequoia Grove., California, United States, North America
  • Isotype: Gray, A. 1868. Proc. Amer. Acad. Arts. 7: 357.
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Isotype for Rudbeckia californica A. Gray
Catalog Number: US 26538
Collection: Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany
Verification Degree: Card file verified by examination of alleged type specimen
Preparation: Pressed specimen
Collector(s): H. N. Bolander
Locality: Mariposa Grove., California, United States, North America
  • Isotype: Gray, A. 1868. Proc. Amer. Acad. Arts. 7: 357.
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Conservation

Conservation Status

National NatureServe Conservation Status

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: N3 - Vulnerable

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NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: T3 - Vulnerable

Reasons: Rudbeckia californica var. californica is in California (1650-2600 meters) in the Klamath Ranges and Sierra Nevada Highlands, occurring in meadows and seeps. It has been reported to be occasional (Munz 1959).

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National NatureServe Conservation Status

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: NNR - Unranked

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NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: G4 - Apparently Secure

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Wikipedia

Rudbeckia californica

Rudbeckia californica is a species of flowering plant in the Sunflower or Aster Family (Asteraceae), known by the common name California coneflower.[1]

Habitat and range[edit]

It is native to California, where it grows in the Sierra Nevada, the Klamath Mountains, and northern coastal areas. It can be found in moist habitat types, such as mountain meadows and streambanks.

Growth pattern[edit]

It is an erect perennial herb growing from a thick rhizome, its stem exceeding one meter in maximum height and sometimes approaching two meters. It usually has no branches.

Leaves[edit]

Most of the large leaves are basal, with a few alternately arranged along the stem. The leaves can be up to 30 centimeters long and are lance-shaped to oval, smooth-edged or lobed.

Inflorescence and fruit[edit]

The inflorescence is a usually solitary sunflower-like flower head with a base up to 6 centimeters wide lined with several ray florets, each of which are 2 to 6 centimeters long. The yellow ray florets extend outwards and then become reflexed, pointing back along the stem. The disc florets filling the button-shaped to conical to cylindrical center of the head are greenish yellow.

The fruits are achenes each about half a centimeter long tipped with a pappus of scales.

Comments[edit]

One variety of this species, var. intermedia, is now generally treated as a species in its own right named Rudbeckia klamathensis, the Klamath coneflower.[2][3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Sierra Nevada Wildflowers, Karen Wiese, 2nd Ed, 2013, p.120
  2. ^ Jepson Manual Treatment: R. klamathensis
  3. ^ Flora of North America: R. klamathensis
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Notes

Comments

Rudbeckia californica grows in the central Sierra Nevada.
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Names and Taxonomy

Taxonomy

Comments: Rudbeckia californica, glaucescens, and klamathensis (as treated by Kartesz, 1999) have sometimes (e.g., by Kartesz in 1994) been treated as varieties (with the names californica, glauca, and intermedia, respectively) in a more broadly viewed species R. californica. LEM 20Feb01.

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Comments: Rudbeckia californica, glaucescens, and klamathensis (as treated by Kartesz, 1999) have sometimes (e.g., by Kartesz in 1994) been treated as varieties (with the names californica, glauca, and intermedia, respectively) in a more broadly viewed species R. californica. LEM 20Feb01.

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