Overview

Distribution

Localities documented in Tropicos sources

Cinnamomum burmannii fo. burmannii :
Burma (Asia)
India (Asia)
Philippines (Asia)
Vietnam (Asia)
China (Asia)

Note: This information is based on publications available through Tropicos and may not represent the entire distribution. Tropicos does not categorize distributions as native or non-native.
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Localities documented in Tropicos sources

Cinnamomum burmannii (Nees & T. Nees) Blume:
Burma (Asia)
Indonesia (Asia)
India (Asia)
Madagascar (Africa & Madagascar)
Philippines (Asia)
Vietnam (Asia)
China (Asia)

Note: This information is based on publications available through Tropicos and may not represent the entire distribution. Tropicos does not categorize distributions as native or non-native.
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© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO 63110 USA

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National Distribution

United States

Origin: Exotic

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Unknown/Undetermined

Confidence: Confident

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Physical Description

Type Information

Isotype for Cinnamomum hainanense Nakai
Catalog Number: US 1753888
Collection: Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany
Verification Degree: Original publication and alleged type specimen examined
Preparation: Pressed specimen
Collector(s): C. I. Lei
Year Collected: 1932
Locality: Tung Pin Tin village., Hainan, China, Asia-Temperate
  • Isotype: Nakai, T. 1939. Fl. Sylvat. Koreana. 22: 24.
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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Barcode data: Cinnamomum burmannii

The following is a representative barcode sequence, the centroid of all available sequences for this species.


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Statistics of barcoding coverage: Cinnamomum burmannii

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 5
Specimens with Barcodes: 5
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Conservation

Conservation Status

NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: GNR - Not Yet Ranked

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National NatureServe Conservation Status

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: NNA - Not Applicable

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Wikipedia

Cinnamomum burmannii

Cinnamomum burmannii, also known as Indonesian cinnamon, Padang cassia, or korintje, is one of several plants in the genus Cinnamomum whose bark is sold as the spice cinnamon. The most common and cheapest type of cinnamon in the US is made from powdered C. burmannii.[citation needed] Cinnamomum burmannii oil contains no eugenol.[2] It is also sold as quills of one layer.[2]

Description[edit]

C. burmannii is an evergreen tree growing up to 7 m in height with aromatic bark and smooth, angular branches.[3] The leaves are glossy green, oval, and about 10 cm (3.9 in) long and 3–4 cm (1.2–1.6 in) wide.[4] Small yellow flowers bloom in early summer,[5] and produce a dark drupe.[3]

Distribution[edit]

Cinnamomum burmanii is native to Southeast Asia and Indonesia.[6] It is normally found in West Sumatra and western Jambi province, with the Kerinci region being especially known as the center of production of quality, high essential-oil crops. C. burmanii grows in wet, tropical climates, and is an introduced species in parts of the subtropical world, particularly in Hawaiʻi, where it is naturalized and invasive.[3][4] It was introduced to Hawaiʻi from Asia in 1934 as a crop plant.[7]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Classification for Kingdom Plantae Down to Species Cinnamomum burmannii (Nees & Th. Nees) Nees ex Blume". Natural Resources Conservation Service. United States Department of Agriculture. Retrieved January 28, 2012. 
  2. ^ a b "Indonesian Cinnamon (Cinnamomum burmannii)". Gernot Katzer’s Spice Pages. Retrieved December 1, 2012. 
  3. ^ a b c Motooka, Philip Susumu (2003). "Cinnamomum burmannii". Weeds of Hawaiʻi's pastures and natural areas: an identification and management guide. University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa: College of Tropical Agriculture and Human Resources. ISBN 1-929325-14-2. Retrieved January 26, 2012. 
  4. ^ a b Starr, Forest; Starr, Kim; Loope, Lloyd (January 2003). "Cinnamomum burmannii". Haleakala Field Station, Maui, Hawai'i: United States Geological Survey--Biological Resources Division. Retrieved January 26, 2012. 
  5. ^ "Cinnamomum burmannii (Lauraceae)". National Tropical Botanical Garden. Retrieved January 29, 2012. 
  6. ^ Wagner, Warren Lambert; Herbst, Derral R.; Sohmer, S. H. (1999). Manual of the Flowering Plants of Hawai'i. Honolulu, Hawaiʻi: University of Hawaiʻi Press. ISBN 978-0-8248-2166-1. 
  7. ^ Wester, Lyndon (1992). "Origin and distribution of adventive alien flowering plants in Hawaiʻi". In Stone, Charles P.; Smith, Clifford W.; Tunison, J. Timothy. Alien plant invasions in native ecosystems of Hawaiʻi: management and research. Honolulu, Hawaiʻi: University of Hawaiʻi Press. p. 141. ISBN 978-0-8248-1474-8. Retrieved January 28, 2012. 
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