Overview

Distribution

National Distribution

United States

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

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Global Range: According to traditional concepts, the taxon is widespread in the western United States, ranging from Kansas and Oklahoma west to Colorado and south to Arizona, western Texas and northern Mexico (Correll and Johnston, 1970); in this interpretation (sensu lato), the taxon might be ranked G5 and the GRANGE would be D. However, Umber (1979) applied the name Glandularia wrightii only to populations of tetraploid plants in the mountains of western Texas and northern Mexico; plants in the balance of the traditional range he apparently considered various varieties of Glandularia bipinnatifida (Nutt.) Nutt. This narrow taxonomic view (sensu stricto) is followed by Henrickson and Johnston (A flora of the Chihuahuan Desert region, in preparation). In this interpretation, G. wrightii might be ranked G4 and the GRANGE would be C. A third opinion was recently offered by Turner (1998), who included these tetraploid plants in Glandularia bipinnatifida var. ciliata (Benth.) B.L. Turner, a taxon that would be ranked G5T5 and with a GRANGE of D. In Kartesz (1999), G. wrightii is also considered a synonym of that variety.

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National Distribution

United States

Origin: Unknown/Undetermined

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Unknown/Undetermined

Confidence: Confident

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Ecology

Habitat

Comments: Henrickson and Johnston in A flora of the Chihuahuan Desert region (in preparation), who were aware of the distinction between Umber's narrow taxonomic view of Glandularia wrightii and the more encompassing traditional concept of Verbena wrightii, considered the relatively newly recognized (tetraploid) taxon common in calcareous soils in the mountains of Trans-Pecos Texas and adjacent northern Mexico.

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Population Biology

Number of Occurrences

Note: For many non-migratory species, occurrences are roughly equivalent to populations.

Estimated Number of Occurrences: 81 to >300

Comments: This estimate is based on the assumption that these tetraploid plants are, like other Glandularia species in this part of the world, rather weedy generalists. Henrickson and Johnston (A flora of the Chihuahuan Desert region, in preparation) considered Glandularia wrightii to be common within its range. Although no effort has been made to determine the number of occurrences, that number certainly exceeds 100.

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Conservation

Conservation Status

National NatureServe Conservation Status

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: N3 - Vulnerable

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NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: G4 - Apparently Secure

Reasons: Glandularia wrightii as circumscribed by Umber (1979) applies to tetraploid plants found only in open areas in the mountains of western Texas and northern Mexico; it is not to be confused with the Verbena wrightii of older manuals, which ranges throughout much of western North America. Even with Umber's narrower redefinition (which is not accepted for example by Kartesz, 1999), the species remains common enough to merit a rank of G4. It thus is not considered a species of conservation concern.

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National NatureServe Conservation Status

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: NNR - Unranked

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NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: T4 - Apparently Secure

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Threats

Comments: Threats to most of the taxa in this group seem to be few. Most are avoided by browsing animals, and most are capable of reaching and colonizing disturbed habitats. It could easily be assumed that the tetraploid plants of Glandularia wrightii in the taxonomic sense or view (sensu stricto) of Umber share this weedy nature, but information is lacking.

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Names and Taxonomy

Taxonomy

Comments: This is not the Verbena wrightii Gray of older North America manuals. Umber (1979) applied the name Glandularia wrightii (Gray) Umber only to populations of tetraploid plants in the mountains of western Texas and northern Mexico; plants in the balance of the traditional range he apparently considered various varieties of Glandularia bipinnatifida (Nutt.) Nutt. This narrow taxonomic view of the circumscription of the Gray name is followed by Henrickson and Johnston for A flora of the Chihuahuan Desert region (in preparation). A third taxonomic opinion is offered by Turner (1998), who included these tetraploid plants in Glandularia bipinnatifida var. ciliata (Benth.) B.L. Turner. This third view apparently coincides with the treatment in Kartesz (1999), where G. wrightii is given as a synonym of that variety.

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