Overview

Comprehensive Description

Miscellaneous Details

Notes: Along shores of lakes and streams
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© India Biodiversity Portal

Source: India Biodiversity Portal

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Brief

Flowering class: Dicot Habit: Herb
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© India Biodiversity Portal

Source: India Biodiversity Portal

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Description

More or less prostrate annual or perennial herb with spreading rosette-forming stems. Leaves opposite, alternate or appearing whorled, elliptic, obovate or spathulate, up to 37 mm long, hairy but never densely so to almost hairless; margin entire. Flowers in clusters at the nodes, greenish-white, sometimes tinged pink, stamens numerous. Fruit a capsule c. 6 mm long.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© Mark Hyde, Bart Wursten and Petra Ballings

Source: Flora of Zimbabwe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Distribution

National Distribution

United States

Origin: Exotic

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Unknown/Undetermined

Confidence: Confident

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

"Maharashtra: Common throughout Karnataka: Belgaum, Dharwar, Hassan, Mysore, N. Kanara, Shimoga Kerala: Idukki, Kannur, Palakkad Tamil Nadu: All districts"
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© India Biodiversity Portal

Source: India Biodiversity Portal

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

"
Global Distribution

Widespread in tropics and subtropics

Indian distribution

State - Kerala, District/s: Palakkad, Idukki, Kannur, Wayanad

"
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© India Biodiversity Portal

Source: India Biodiversity Portal

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Distribution in Egypt

Nile region, oases, Mediterranean region, eastern desert, Gebel Elba and Sinai.

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Bibliotheca Alexandrina

Source: Bibliotheca Alexandrina - EOL Ar

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Global Distribution

Tropical and subtropical regions worldwide.

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Bibliotheca Alexandrina

Source: Bibliotheca Alexandrina - EOL Ar

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Hainan, Taiwan, Yunnan [Indonesia, Malaysia, Philippines, Sri Lanka; N and tropical Africa, S to SE Asia, S Europe, tropical America, Oceania].
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

introduced; Ark., Calif., Kans., La., Mo., Okla., Tex.; Mexico; West Indies; South America; Eurasia; Africa; Australia.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Worldwide distribution

Widespread in the Paleotropics and subtropics
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© Mark Hyde, Bart Wursten and Petra Ballings

Source: Flora of Zimbabwe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Distribution: Most tropical parts of the world; Ceylon, Africa, India, W. Pakistan etc.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Physical Description

Morphology

Description

Annual procumbent herb up to 40 cm long, with stellate woolly parts. Leaves sub-verticillate, 0.6-2.0 cm long, 0.5-1.8 cm broad, orbiculate or more or less cuneate, often mucronate; petiole 2-8 mm long. Flowers in axillary clusters of 5(-6), sub-sessile; pedicel up to 1.5 mm long. Sepals 4-4.5mm long, up to 7 mm in fruit, persistent, ovate to ovate-oblong, apiculate, imbricate. Fertile stamens 12; filaments 2-3.5 mm long, unequal, persistent; anthers less than 1 mm long, bilobed. Ovary c. 2 mm long, ovoid. Stigmas 5 (4), linear, c. 1 mm long, persistent. Capsule sub-globose or oblong, c. 6 mm long, membranous, enclosed in the sepals. Seeds many, less than 1 mm long, tuberculate, strophiolate, with a curved linear appendage c. 3/4 the size of the seed.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Description

Herbs sturdy, densely stellate tomentose. Stems decumbent, 10-40 cm, much branched. Petiole very short; basal leaves in a rosette, drying soon; upper leaves verticillate or opposite, obovate to oblong-spatulate, 6-24 × 5-15 mm, base attenuate, decurrent, margin entire, apex obtuse, rounded, or acute. Flowers several, in groups, sessile or subsessile. Tepals elliptic or oblong, 4-6(-10) mm. Stamens usually 3-15, free. Ovary ovoid, 5-loculed; styles 5, free, linear, short, curved outward. Capsule ovoid, ca. as long as persistent tepals, 5-valved. Seeds numerous, chestnut-brown, reniform, granulose; strophiole scrotiform, ca. 2/3 as long as seed or longer. Fl. and fr. spring-summer. 2n = 36.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Description

Stems 0.5-3.5 dm. Leaves whor-led; petiole 1-7 mm; blade obovate or orbiculate to broadly spatulate, 5-25 × 0.4-17 mm, base cuneate, apex broadly rounded to acute. Flowers in clusters of 3-15; sepals lanceolate, 3.5-4.1 × 0.4-2 mm, stellate-pubescent abaxially, glabrous adaxially, apex rounded to acute or slightly mucronate; stamens 3-5. Capsules ellipsoid, 3.6-4.5 × 1.8-2 mm. Seeds 10-25 per locule, orange-brown, 0.4-0.6 × 0.3-0.4 mm, papillate, somewhat glossy or dull; papillae sometimes black. 2n = 36.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Diagnostic Description

Diagnostic

"Prostrate herbs. Leaves whorled, 3 or 4 at each node, to 3 x 1.5 cm, obovate to orbicular, obtuse, penninerved; petiole 5-10 mm long. Flowers in greenish-white, axillary fascicles of 3-5; pedicels 5-10 mm long; sepals 6 x 3 mm, densely stellate hairy, keeled; stamens 10-15, mixed with staminodes; ovary 3-celled, ellipsoidal, glabrous; styles 3, short."
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© India Biodiversity Portal

Source: India Biodiversity Portal

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Diagnostic

Habit: Herb
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© India Biodiversity Portal

Source: India Biodiversity Portal

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Synonym

Mollugo hirta Thunberg; M. lotoides (Linnaeus) Kuntze.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Synonym

Glinus dictamnoides Burman f.; Mollugo glinus A. Richard; M. hirta Thunberg
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Ecology

Habitat

General Habitat

"Along shores of lakes and streams, also in deciduous forests"
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© India Biodiversity Portal

Source: India Biodiversity Portal

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Nile and canal banks, moist ground.

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Bibliotheca Alexandrina

Source: Bibliotheca Alexandrina - EOL Ar

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Moist soils, river bottoms, lake margins, marshes, waste places; 0-1300m.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Open sands, riversides, cultivated fields, waste places; sea level to 500 m.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Life History and Behavior

Cyclicity

Flowering and fruiting: April-May
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© India Biodiversity Portal

Source: India Biodiversity Portal

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Flowering/Fruiting

Flowering late summer-fall.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Flower/Fruit

Fl. Per.: Febr.-April.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Life Expectancy

Annual.

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Bibliotheca Alexandrina

Source: Bibliotheca Alexandrina - EOL Ar

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Barcode data: Glinus lotoides

The following is a representative barcode sequence, the centroid of all available sequences for this species.


Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© Barcode of Life Data Systems

Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Statistics of barcoding coverage: Glinus lotoides

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 5
Specimens with Barcodes: 15
Species With Barcodes: 1
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© Barcode of Life Data Systems

Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Conservation

Conservation Status

National NatureServe Conservation Status

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: NNA - Not Applicable

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: G5 - Secure

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Wikipedia

Glinus lotoides

Glinus lotoides is a species of flowering plant in the family Molluginaceae known by the common names damascisa and lotus sweetjuice. It is native to Eurasia and Africa and it is known in many other places as an introduced species. It is a prostrate to somewhat upright annual herb with a stem up to about 30 or 35 centimeters long and coated in feltlike whitish hairs. The oval or spade-shaped leaves are located in whorls about the stem. Each is a few millimeters to 3 centimeters long. The inflorescence is a tight cluster of five to ten small flowers. Each flower has five woolly sepals and no petals. The fruit is an oval capsule about four millimeters long.

Uses[edit]

This plant is found in seasonally inundated land and has many traditional uses in cultures across its large native range, as medicine and as food. Young leaves and stems of Glinus lotoides are used as a vegetable in some tropical countries.[1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Stephen Facciola (1990). Plant species with leaves that have reportedly been eaten by people
Creative Commons Attribution Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-SA 3.0)

Source: Wikipedia

Unreviewed

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Notes

Comments

Glinus lotoides is native to Eurasia and Africa and has become widespread in tropical, subtropical, and warm-temperate areas worldwide. Several varieties have been described, but their delimitations are unclear and need further investigation. The vernacular name "damascisa" is applied to this species, as well as several other plants, which are used in Africa for treatment of diabetes and skin ailments (A. El-Hamidi et al. 1967). In India, the species is used as treatment for diarrhea, boils, and abdominal diseases, as well as weakness in children (K. R. Kirtikar and B. D. Basu 1935). Antihelmintic properties are reported for G. lotoides from several African studies (B. Abegaz and B. Tecle 1980; G. Broberg 1980).
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Comments

The tender shoots can be eaten as a pot herb. Also used in medicine and as fodder for goats.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Disclaimer

EOL content is automatically assembled from many different content providers. As a result, from time to time you may find pages on EOL that are confusing.

To request an improvement, please leave a comment on the page. Thank you!