Overview

Distribution

Absent from mainland Britain and French Channel coasts east of Barfleur
  • Hayward, P.J.; Ryland, J.S. (Ed.) (1990). The marine fauna of the British Isles and North-West Europe: 1. Introduction and protozoans to arthropods. Clarendon Press: Oxford, UK. ISBN 0-19-857356-1. 627 pp.
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Source: World Register of Marine Species

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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Barcode data: Gibbula pennanti

The following is a representative barcode sequence, the centroid of all available sequences for this species.


No available public DNA sequences.

Download FASTA File
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© Barcode of Life Data Systems

Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

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Statistics of barcoding coverage: Gibbula pennanti

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 1
Specimens with Barcodes: 1
Species With Barcodes: 1
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© Barcode of Life Data Systems

Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

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Wikipedia

Gibbula pennanti

Gibbula pennanti is a species of small sea snail, a marine gastropod mollusc in the family Trochidae, the top snails. [1]

The species was named in honor of Thomas Pennant (1726 – 1798) was a Welsh naturalist.

Description[edit]

The size of the shell varies between 10 mm and 16 mm. The shell is more depressed than Gibbula cineraria, and (although the base is flatter) never inclined to a pyramidal form. The spiral ridges are sharper and fewer, especially in the young. The present species is usually more widely umbilicate and broader than Gibbula cineraria. The coloring is different; both have a similar kind of marking, but in the present species the longitudinal rays or streaks are red, besides being broader and not half so many as in the other species. And they are sometimes zigzag, instead of being broken into spots or interrupted by the sculpture. This species is striped, the other lineated. Just within the outer lip are two borders, one of yellow, the other of green variegated by red spots. This edging is minutely tubercled like shagreen. [2]

Distribution[edit]

This species occurs in the North Sea and off Spain.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Gofas, S. (2013). Gibbula pennanti (Philippi, 1846). Accessed through: World Register of Marine Species at http://www.marinespecies.org/aphia.php?p=taxdetails&id=141792 on 2014-01-30
  2. ^ Tryon (1889), Manual of Conchology XI, Academy of Natural Sciences, Philadelphia (described as Gibbula obliquata)
  • Gmelin J. F., 1791: Carli Linnaei systema Naturae per regna tria naturae. Editio decimatertia, aucta, reformata, Vermes Testacea ; Leipzig [Lipsiae] 1 (6): 3021-3910
  • Aradas A., 1847: Descrizione delle conchiglie fossili di Gravitelli presso Messina ; Atti dell'Accademia Gioenia di Scienze Naturali (2) 4: 57-88
  • Monterosato T. A. (di), 1888-1889: Molluschi del Porto di Palermo. Specie e varietà; Bullettino della Società Malacologica Italiana, Pisa 13 (1888[1889?]): 161-180 14 (1889): 75-81
  • Gofas, S.; Le Renard, J.; Bouchet, P. (2001). Mollusca, in: Costello, M.J. et al. (Ed.) (2001). European register of marine species: a check-list of the marine species in Europe and a bibliography of guides to their identification. Collection Patrimoines Naturels, 50: pp. 180-213
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