Overview

Distribution

National Distribution

United States

Origin: Exotic

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Unknown/Undetermined

Confidence: Confident

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introduced; Ill., Iowa, Minn.; e Asia (n China, Japan, Korea, Manchuria).
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Gansu, Hebei, Heilongjiang, Jiangsu, Jilin, Liaoning, Nei Mongol, Ningxia, Shandong, Shanxi [Japan, Korea, Russia (Far East)].
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Physical Description

Morphology

Description

Plants annual, 3-8 dm; roots not also arising from proximal nodes. Stems ascending to erect, ribbed or obscurely so, glabrous or glandular-pubescent distally; prickles 1-1.5 mm. Leaves: ocrea brownish, cylindric, 8-14 mm, chartaceous, base inflated or not, without prickles, margins truncate, ciliate with bristles 2-4 mm, surface with appressed bristles along veins; petiole 0.5-1.5 cm; blade lanceolate to narrowly elliptic, 5-12.5 × 1.5-3.5 cm, base acute, margins entire, antrorsely ciliate, apex acute acuminate, rarely obtuse, faces glabrous or pubescent and, usually, with antrorse prickles along midvein abaxially and adaxially. Inflorescences racemelike, uninterrupted or interrupted proximally, 20-45 × 5-10 mm; peduncle 20-40 mm, usually stipitate-glandular at least proximally; ocreolae usually overlapping, sometimes not overlapping proximally, margins eciliate. Pedicels mostly ascending, 2-3 mm. Flowers 2-4 per ocreate fascicle; perianth pale green, often tinged red, glabrous, accrescent, not becoming blue and fleshy in fruit; tepals 5, connate 1/ 1/ 3 their length, petaloid, elliptic to broadly elliptic, 3-4 mm, apex obtuse; stamens 8, filaments distinct, free; anthers pink, ovate; styles 2, connate to middle. Achenes included, black, biconvex, 2.5-3 × 2.3-2.8 mm, dull, rugose.
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Description

Herbs annual. Stems erect or ascending, 30-80 cm tall, branched, retrorsely prickly. Petiole 5-10 mm; leaf blade green adaxially, lanceolate or narrowly elliptic, 4-13 × 1-3 cm, abaxially hispidulous, adaxially glabrous, usually hispidulous along midvein, base cuneate, margin ciliate, apex acute or subacuminate; ocrea tubular, 1-1.5 cm, membranous, apex truncate, long ciliate. Inflorescence terminal or axillary, spicate, 5-10 mm, usually branched, interrupted at base; peduncle densely glandular hairy; bracts green, funnel-shaped, not ciliate, glabrous, often with few glandular hairs. Pedicels shorter than bracts. Perianth white or pinkish, 5-parted; tepals elliptic, 3-4 mm. Stamens 8, in 2 whorls, included. Styles 2, connate to below middle; stigmas capitate. Achenes included in persistent perianth, black, dull, orbicular, biconvex, ca. 3 mm. Fl. Jul-Aug, fr. Aug-Sep. 2n = 20.
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Diagnostic Description

Synonym

Polygonum bungeanum Turczaninow, Bull. Soc. Imp. Naturalistes Moscou 13: 77. 1840
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Synonym

Polygonum pensylvanicum Bunge, Enum. Pl. China Bor. 57. 1833, not Linnaeus (1753); Persicaria bungeana (Turczaninow) Nakai ex T. Mori; Polygonum chanetii H. Léveillé.
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Ecology

Habitat

Cultivated fields; 300-400m.
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Grassy valleys, near fields, roadsides; sea level to 1700 m.
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Life History and Behavior

Cyclicity

Flowering/Fruiting

Flowering Jul-Sep.
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Conservation

Conservation Status

National NatureServe Conservation Status

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: NNA - Not Applicable

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NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: GNR - Not Yet Ranked

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Notes

Comments

Persicaria bungeana is a weed of soybean fields (R. N. Andersen et al. 1985). It is not known how or when it was introduced into the midwestern United States.
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