Overview

Distribution

Range Description

This species is endemic to the Marquesas Islands (Röckel et al. 1995).
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Ecology

Habitat

Habitat and Ecology

Habitat and Ecology
This species occurs at depths of 8-25 m (collections and observations from diving), where it lives on clean sand (Röckel et al. 1995, Poppe and Poppe 2011). They remain buried in the sand substrate during the day, and emerge at night and appear to prefer areas with polychaete pseudo-reefs. Adults of the species can grow to 35 mm although they will typically be less than this (Röckel et al. 1995).

Systems
  • Marine
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Conservation

Conservation Status

IUCN Red List Assessment


Red List Category
LC
Least Concern

Red List Criteria

Version
3.1

Year Assessed
2013

Assessor/s
Bouchet, P.

Reviewer/s
Seddon, M. & Peters, H.

Contributor/s

Justification
This species is endemic to the Marquesas Islands. While this species does have a restricted range, it does not appear to suffer major threats, and there are plans for the establishment of high levels of protection in the future. It is listed as Least Concern.
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Population

Population
This species is considered to be locally common (P. Bouchet pers. comm. 2011).

Population Trend
Unknown
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Threats

Major Threats

This species is endemic to the Marquesas to which its range is restricted. This species lives in shallow water and may suffer loss of abundance if over-gathered, particularly in the more popular anchorages for yachting tourists. However, at present the species does not indicate any risk from this factor.

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Management

Conservation Actions

Conservation Actions
This species is restricted in its range and would benefit from further research into populations, distribution, habitat, level of off-take and threats (including the impact of fisheries) before any action plan can be formulated. There are no known conservation measures currently in place for this species.

There are plans in the next three years to establish the Marquesas as a marine protected area and an UNESCO World Heritage Site.
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Wikipedia

Conus encaustus

Conus encaustus, common name the burnt cone, is a species of sea snail, a marine gastropod mollusk in the family Conidae, the cone snails and their allies.[2]

Like all species within the genus Conus, these snails are predatory and venomous. They are capable of "stinging" humans, therefore live ones should be handled carefully or not at all.

Contents

Description

The size of an adult shell varies between 21.1 mm and 35 mm. The spire is depressed, grooved and coronated with tubercles. The body whorl has distant punctured grooves, more strongly and closely grooved towards the base. The color of the shell is clouded with chocolate- and ash-color, and encircled with numerous chocolate and white spots in lines. The aperture is purplish. [3]

Distribution

This marine species is endemic to the Marquesas Islands.

References

  1. ^ Kiener, L. C., 1845. Spécies Général et Iconographie des Coquilles Vivantes, 2.
  2. ^ a b Conus encaustus Kiener, 1845.  Retrieved through: World Register of Marine Species on 19 July 2011.
  3. ^ George Washington Tryon, Manual of Conchology, vol. VI, p. 21; 1879
  • Filmer R.M. (2001). A Catalogue of Nomenclature and Taxonomy in the Living Conidae 1758 - 1998. Backhuys Publishers, Leiden. 388pp
  • Tucker J.K. (2009). Recent cone species database. September 4th 2009 Edition
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