Overview

Distribution

Range Description

This species is endemic to the coast of Angola from Benguela in the north to just north of Lucira, a distance of approximately 400 km following the coast (Monteiro et al. 2004). The species is common within the range (E. Monnier pers. comm. 2004), with many locations along the coast. The extent of its range is probably more than 400 km, with new populations found in central and south Angola (M. J. Tenorio pers. comm. 2011).
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Physical Description

Type Information

Paralectotype for Conus alexandrinus Kaicher, 1977
Catalog Number: USNM 894725
Collection: Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of Natural History, Department of Invertebrate Zoology
Preparation: Dry
Year Collected: 1976
Locality: Caota Bay, Benguela, Angola, South Atlantic Ocean
Microhabitat: In sand under rocks
Depth (m): 1
  • Paralectotype:
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Paralectotype for Conus lineopunctatus Kaicher, 1977
Catalog Number: USNM 894726
Collection: Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of Natural History, Department of Invertebrate Zoology
Preparation: Dry
Year Collected: 1968
Locality: Elefantes Bay, Benguela, Angola, South Atlantic Ocean
Depth (m): 20 to 20
  • Paralectotype:
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Ecology

Habitat

Habitat and Ecology

Habitat and Ecology
This species has been found in sand in shallow water (Poppe and Poppe 2011) and down to 10 m in mud (Filmer 2001).

Systems
  • Marine
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Conservation

Conservation Status

IUCN Red List Assessment


Red List Category
LC
Least Concern

Red List Criteria

Version
3.1

Year Assessed
2012

Assessor/s
Monnier, E.

Reviewer/s
Tenorio, M.J., Seddon, M. & Peters, H.

Contributor/s
Veldsman, S.G.

Justification
This species is endemic to the coast of Angola from Benguela in the north to just north of Lucira a distance of approximately 400 km following the coast. The species is common within the range (E. Monnier pers. comm. 2011), with many locations along the coast. There are no specific current threats from urban development or other major anthropogenic factors. Oil prospecting has been carried out along Angola's coast and eventually oil exploration may have an effect on Angola's coast in the future, but there is no current development of these activities. The species has been assessed as Least Concern.
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Population

Population
There are no data on the population levels for this species, but it is commonly available for sale. The maximum size of specimen is 31 mm. Together with C. aemulus, this is the most common Conus species in Angola (M. J. Tenorio pers. comm. 2011).

Population Trend
Unknown
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Threats

Major Threats
There are no known threats to this species at the present time. It occurs in central and south Angola and hence away from the capital, so that pollution is not a problem for this species (M. J. Tenorio pers. comm. 2011). Oil prospection has been going on along the Angolan coast, but there is no further development on this at the moment, so this is not considered a current threat; it may be more significant in the future if oil drilling commences (M. J. Tenorio and S. Veldsman pers. comm. 2011).
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Management

Conservation Actions

Conservation Actions
There are no known conservation measures currently in place for this species.
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Wikipedia

Conus bulbus

Conus bulbus is a species of sea snail, a marine gastropod mollusk in the family Conidae, the cone snails and their allies.[1]

Like all species within the genus Conus, these snails are predatory and venomous. They are capable of "stinging" humans, therefore live ones should be handled carefully or not at all.

Contents

Description

Distribution

References

  1. ^ a b Conus bulbus Reeve, 1843.  Retrieved through: World Register of Marine Species on 27 March 2010.
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