Overview

Distribution

Range Description

This species is found from Malaysia, Indonesia, Philippines, north towards Japan. It also occurs in Papua New Guinea (Röckel et al. 1995).

The EOO, AOO and number of locations for this species exceed the threshold for criteria for B1, B2 and D2.
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Ecology

Habitat

Habitat and Ecology

Habitat and Ecology
This species can be found on various different substrates and in various habitats including sand, mangroves, in intertidal areas, and in deeper waters to around 60 m (Poppe 2009). The maximum size is 71 mm but they will generally be less than this (Röckel et al. 1995).

The species has been found to feed mainly on other marine molluscs (Nam et al. 2009).


Systems
  • Marine
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Depth range based on 1 specimen in 1 taxon.
Water temperature and chemistry ranges based on 1 sample.

Environmental ranges
  Depth range (m): 46 - 46
  Temperature range (°C): 26.891 - 26.891
  Nitrate (umol/L): 1.305 - 1.305
  Salinity (PPS): 34.439 - 34.439
  Oxygen (ml/l): 3.858 - 3.858
  Phosphate (umol/l): 0.533 - 0.533
  Silicate (umol/l): 6.180 - 6.180
 
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Conservation

Conservation Status

IUCN Red List Assessment


Red List Category
LC
Least Concern

Red List Criteria

Version
3.1

Year Assessed
2013

Assessor/s
Kohn, A.

Reviewer/s
Peters, H. & Poppe, G.

Contributor/s

Justification
This species is found from Malaysia, Indonesia, Philippines, north towards Japan. It also occurs in Papua New Guinea. This species is fairly widespread and is common throughout its range. There are no known threats, therefore it is listed as Least Concern.
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Population

Population
This species is common (G.T. Poppe pers. comm 2011).



Population Trend
Unknown
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Threats

Major Threats
There are no known threats to this species.
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Management

Conservation Actions

Conservation Actions
There are no known conservation measures currently in place for this species. It probably occurs in marine protected areas within its range.
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Wikipedia

Conus furvus

Conus furvus Reeve, L.A., 1843

Conus furvus, common name the dark cone, is a species of predatory sea snail, a marine gastropod mollusk in the family Conidae, the cone snails, cone shells or cones.[2]

Contents

Description

The size of an adult shell varies between 30 mm and 71 mm. The ground color of the shell is pale brown, with fine close lines of chestnut-brown, and one or two paler bands. The shoulder ( = the angulation of the shell whorls) is somewhat obtuse. The spire is concavely elevated, with an acute apex. The spire is uniform pale brown.[3] Tryon describes the variety furvus with this special characteristics. The revolving lines are broken up into minute dots The form is somewhat narrower. Some of the spire whorls are finely beaded.[3]

Distribution

This is an Indo-Pacific species. The type locality is Port Sacloban, Leyte Island in the Philippines. The species occurs along the Andaman Islands, Malaysia, Indonesia, Papua New Guinea and from the Philippines to Japan. It is also found in the South China Sea.

References

  1. ^ Reeve, L. A., 1843. Monograph of the genus Conus. Conchologia Iconica, i: figures and descriptions of the shells of molluscs; with remarks on their affinities, synonymy, and geographical distribution, 1. Conus
  2. ^ a b WoRMS (2010). Conus furvus Reeve, 1843. Accessed through: World Register of Marine Species at http://www.marinespecies.org/aphia.php?p=taxdetails&id=428130 on 2011-07-23
  3. ^ a b George Washington Tryon, Manual of Conchology vol. VI, p. 51; 1879 (described as Conus lignarius)
  • Conus lignarius - Some information on this species
  • Filmer R.M. (2001). A Catalogue of Nomenclature and Taxonomy in the Living Conidae 1758 - 1998. Backhuys Publishers, Leiden. 388pp.
  • Tucker J.K. (2009). Recent cone species database. September 4, 2009 Edition
  • Tucker J.K. & Tenorio M.J. (2009) Systematic classification of Recent and fossil conoidean gastropods. Hackenheim: Conchbooks. 296 pp
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