Overview

Distribution

Range Description

This species occurs from the north west coast of India to Sri Lanka, and then eastwards to Indonesia and northwards to Hong Kong. Its subspecies, Conus hyaena concolor, is known from the Solomon Islands and Papua New Guinea, and has been recently reported from the Indonesian area (Röckel et al. 1995).

The EOO, AOO and number of locations exceed the thresholds for criteria B1 and B2.

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Range Description

This species is found in Papua New Guinea, Solomon Islands and Flores, Indonesia (Röckel et al. 1995). Both the EOO and the AOO exceed the threshold for criteria B1 and B2. This species is found to 100 m (Röckel et al. 1995).
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Ecology

Habitat

Habitat and Ecology

Habitat and Ecology
This species is common within intertidal and slightly subtidal habitats, with deeper populations (to 50 m) known only from south India. This cone snail species tends to inhabit substrates ranging from fine sand to coarse gravel or rock (Kohn 1978). Its subspecies, C. h. concolor, on the other hand, is thought to occur mainly in subtidal habitats between depths of 3 and 30 m on flats of coarse sand and on mud, often beneath rotting plants (Röckel and Korn 1992), also in rock crevices, and in eel-grass. Adults of the species are approx 73 mm although they will typically be less than this. They are vermiverous mainly feeding on polychaetes (Röckel et al. 1995).

Systems
  • Marine
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Habitat and Ecology

Habitat and Ecology
This species is found on sand bottom in subtidal habitats to 100 m. Once mature, it can reach a size ranging from 24 to 32 mm (Röckel et al. 1995).

Systems
  • Marine
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Conservation

Conservation Status

IUCN Red List Assessment


Red List Category
LC
Least Concern

Red List Criteria

Version
3.1

Year Assessed
2013

Assessor/s
Kohn, A.

Reviewer/s
Peters, H. & Poppe, G.

Contributor/s

Justification

This species occurs from the north west coast of India to Sri Lanka, and then eastwards to Indonesia and northwards to Hong Kong. Its subspecies, Conus hyaena concolor, is known from the Solomon Islands and Papua New Guinea, and has been recently reported from the Indonesian area. This species is widely distributed in the Indo-Pacific and there are no current known threats. It is therefore listed as Least Concern.

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IUCN Red List Assessment


Red List Category
LC
Least Concern

Red List Criteria

Version
3.1

Year Assessed
2013

Assessor/s
Kohn, A.

Reviewer/s
Peters, H. & Poppe, G.

Contributor/s

Justification

This species is found in Papua New Guinea, Solomon Islands and Flores, Indonesia. This is a wide ranging species and is uncommon throughout its range. There are no known major threats, therefore it is listed as Least Concern.

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Population

Population
This species is common in India and Indonesia but rare in the Philippines. It is very common in the western part of its range and becomes scarce to the east (Poppe pers. comm. 2011).
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Population

Population
This species is uncommon throughout its range, except in the Solomon Islands (G.T. Poppe pers. comm. 2011).

Population Trend
Unknown
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Threats

Major Threats

There are no known threats to this species at the present time.

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Major Threats
There are no known threats to this species.
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Management

Conservation Actions

Conservation Actions
There are no known conservation measures currently in place for this species. This species probably occurs in marine protected areas within some parts of its range.
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Conservation Actions

Conservation Actions
There are no known conservation measures currently in place for this species.
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Wikipedia

Conus hyaena

Conus hyaena Hwass in Bruguière, J.G., 1792

Conus hyaena, common name the hyena cone, is a species of sea snail, a marine gastropod mollusk in the family Conidae, the cone snails and their allies.[2]

These snails are predatory and venomous. They are capable of "stinging" humans, therefore live ones should be handled carefully or not at all.

Contents

Description

The size of an adult shell varies between 29 mm and 80.5 mm. The shell is somewhat swollen above. The spire is striate. The color of the shell is light yellowish brown, variegated by darker strigations, and faint revolving lines or rows of spots, often indistinctly lighter-banded in the middle. [3]

Distribution

This species occurs in the Indian Ocean along Madagascar, in the Bay of Bengal, and in the Pacific Ocean along the Philippines and Indonesia; in the South China Sea.

References

  1. ^ Bruguière, J. G., and Hwass, C. H., 1792. Cone. Encyclopédie Méthodique: Histoire Naturelle des Vers, 1: 586 -757
  2. ^ a b Conus hyaena Hwass in Bruguière, 1792.  Retrieved through: World Register of Marine Species on 25 July 2011.
  3. ^ George Washington Tryon, Manual of Conchology vol. VI, p. 40; 1879 (described as Conus mutabilis)
  • Dautzenberg, P. (1923). Liste préliminaire des mollusques marins de Madagascar et description de deux especes nouvelles. Journal de Conchyliologie 68: 21-74
  • Filmer R.M. (2001). A Catalogue of Nomenclature and Taxonomy in the Living Conidae 1758 - 1998. Backhuys Publishers, Leiden. 388pp
  • Tucker J.K. (2009). Recent cone species database. September 4th 2009 Edition
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