Overview

Distribution

Range Description

C. cedonulli is found throughout the Lesser Antilles from Grenada to St Lucia to off Barbados. However, the typical form of C. cedonulli cedonulli Linneaus 1767 is endemic to the west coast of St Lucia, St Vincent and Bequia (Grenadines) (Tucker 2010, Rosenberg 2009).
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources

Source: IUCN

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Ecology

Habitat

Habitat and Ecology

Habitat and Ecology
This is a vermiverous cone snail (Terlau and Olivera 2004) that lives at depths from 2 to 50 m. Adults of the species can grow to approx 62 mm. This species has been found in sand with turtle grass (Coltro and Petuch pers. comm. 2011).

Systems
  • Marine
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources

Source: IUCN

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Depth range based on 3 specimens in 1 taxon.
Water temperature and chemistry ranges based on 3 samples.

Environmental ranges
  Depth range (m): 30 - 174
  Temperature range (°C): 21.085 - 27.381
  Nitrate (umol/L): 0.547 - 4.967
  Salinity (PPS): 35.435 - 36.754
  Oxygen (ml/l): 3.715 - 4.645
  Phosphate (umol/l): 0.111 - 0.372
  Silicate (umol/l): 2.115 - 2.327

Graphical representation

Depth range (m): 30 - 174

Temperature range (°C): 21.085 - 27.381

Nitrate (umol/L): 0.547 - 4.967

Salinity (PPS): 35.435 - 36.754

Oxygen (ml/l): 3.715 - 4.645

Phosphate (umol/l): 0.111 - 0.372

Silicate (umol/l): 2.115 - 2.327
 
Note: this information has not been validated. Check this *note*. Your feedback is most welcome.

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Conservation

Conservation Status

IUCN Red List Assessment


Red List Category
LC
Least Concern

Red List Criteria

Version
3.1

Year Assessed
2013

Assessor/s
Petuch, E.

Reviewer/s
Peters, H. & Coltro, J.

Contributor/s

Justification
This species is restricted to the Lesser Antilles from Grenada to St Lucia to off Barbados. There are no major threats, although could be over-collected in local populations. This species is listed as Least Concern.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources

Source: IUCN

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Population

Population
There are no population data in the literature.

Population Trend
Unknown
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources

Source: IUCN

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Threats

Major Threats
There are no major threats to this species. There is some potential to be over-collected on a local scale (Petuch pers. comm. 2011).
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources

Source: IUCN

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Management

Conservation Actions

Conservation Actions
There are no known conservation measures currently in place for this species.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources

Source: IUCN

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Wikipedia

Conus cedonulli

Conus cedonulli is a species of sea snail, a marine gastropod mollusk in the family Conidae, the cone snails and their allies.[1]

Like all species within the genus Conus, these snails are predatory and venomous. They are capable of "stinging" humans, therefore live ones should be handled carefully or not at all.

Being a very varied species-complex, there has been much confusion in the course of years about which species and subspecies to assign to the Conus cedonulli-complex, hence the number of synonyms named.
In 1985 D.L.N. Vink proposed assigning the following species to the Conus cedonulli-complex along with Conus cedonulli :[2]

The following subspecies of Conus cedonulli are recognized by the World Register of Marine Species:

Description[edit]

The color of the species in this complex is white to purplish grey
although specimens from St. Vincent are very often dark-mahogany-brown, with some rare examples being 'black' or near-black.[5]
The shell is crossed by streaks that are alternately light and dark. Between these streaks yellow, brown or dark dots occur.
The operculum is small compared to the aperture and is only one seventh its size.
The soft body of the animal is dark red. [6]
The size of an adult shell varies between 38 mm and 78 mm.

Distribution[edit]

This species occurs in the Caribbean Sea from Colombia to Trinidad, along the Lesser Antilles and along the Bahamas.
Off West coast BARBADOS, the species has been dredged at depths around 85 fathoms/510 feet.
This would appear to be the species' bathymetric maximum, since at other locations the species is usually found at much shallower depths.[7]

Gallery[edit]

Below are several color forms and two subspecies:

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Conus cedonulli Linnaeus, 1758.  Retrieved through: World Register of Marine Species on 27 March 2010.
  2. ^ D.L.N. Vink, The Conus cedonulli complex; Zoologische Mededelingen, 51 (5), 1979 p.79-93
  3. ^ Conus cedonulli dominicus Hwass in Bruguière, 1792.  Retrieved through: World Register of Marine Species on 11 September 2011.
  4. ^ Conus cedonulli insularis Gmelin, 1791.  Retrieved through: World Register of Marine Species on 11 September 2011.
  5. ^ Personal marine bio experience
  6. ^ Personal marine bio experience
  7. ^ Personal marine bio experience via trappings and dredgings, during the 1980's
  • Vink, D. L. N. and von Cosel, R. 1985. The Conus cedonulli complex: historical review, taxonomy and biological observations. Revue Suisse de Zoologie 92(3):525-603, 9 figs, 12 pls.
  • Filmer R.M. (2001). A Catalogue of Nomenclature and Taxonomy in the Living Conidae 1758 - 1998. Backhuys Publishers, Leiden. 388pp
  • Tucker J.K. (2009). Recent cone species database. September 4, 2009 Edition
Creative Commons Attribution Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-SA 3.0)

Source: Wikipedia

Unreviewed

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Disclaimer

EOL content is automatically assembled from many different content providers. As a result, from time to time you may find pages on EOL that are confusing.

To request an improvement, please leave a comment on the page. Thank you!