Overview

Distribution

Range Description

This species is endemic to Australia where it is found around Swain Reefs, situated in the southern region of the Great Barrier Reef (Röckel et al. 1995, Singleton 2007). It lives between 170 m and 250 m, and can only be found along approx 370 km along Swain Reefs. Singleton (2007) indicates that the range of this species could be even more restricted.
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Ecology

Habitat

Habitat and Ecology

Habitat and Ecology
This species is found on mud and sand between 170 m and 250 m. Once mature, it can reach a size ranging from 35 to 52 mm (Röckel et al. 1995).

Systems
  • Marine
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Conservation

Conservation Status

IUCN Red List Assessment


Red List Category
DD
Data Deficient

Red List Criteria

Version
3.1

Year Assessed
2013

Assessor/s
Morrison, H.

Reviewer/s
Peters, H. & Wells, F.E.

Contributor/s

Justification
This species is endemic to Australia where it is found around Swain Reefs, in the southern part of the Great Barrier Reef. There is little information concerning its population and habitat/ecology as it is only taken as dead specimens. However, there are no major threats known to affect it and the changing in fishing methods and reduction in overall bycatch in Australian fisheries has positively impacted this species and reduced the amount of take. It is listed as Data Deficient until more is known about this species and there are live specimens collected or observed to confirm its existence, population, and life-history.
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Population

Population
This species is collected by trawl only, at consistently considerable numbers, however only dead specimens, no live specimens have been collected (H. Morrison pers. comm. 2011)

Population Trend
Unknown
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Threats

Major Threats

There are no major threat known to affect this species as it has a deep habitat and is not a specific target fishery and is becoming less available due to the newly enacted zero bycatch law. There are no other major threats known to affect this species.

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Management

Conservation Actions

Conservation Actions
The change in fishing methods and reduction in overall bycatch in Australian fisheries has positively impacted this species and reduced the amount of take (H. Morrison pers. comm. 2011).
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Wikipedia

Conus colmani

Conus colmani is a species of sea snail, a marine gastropod mollusk in the family Conidae, the cone snails and their allies.[2]

Like all species within the genus Conus, these snails are predatory and venomous. They are capable of "stinging" humans, therefore live ones should be handled carefully or not at all.

Contents

Description

The size of an adult shell varies between 35 mm and 52 mm.

Distribution

This marine species is found along Queensland, Australia.

References

  1. ^ Röckel, D., and Korn, W., 1990. Zur Identiät von Conus lizardensis Crosse, 1865 und Conus sibogae Schepman, 1913 - mit Beschreibung dreier neuer Conus-Arten von Queensland, Australien (Mollusca: Conidae). Acta Conchyliorum, 2: 5 -22
  2. ^ a b Conus colmani Röckel & Korn, 1990.  Retrieved through: World Register of Marine Species on 17 July 2011.
  • Filmer R.M. (2001). A Catalogue of Nomenclature and Taxonomy in the Living Conidae 1758 - 1998. Backhuys Publishers, Leiden. 388pp.
  • Tucker J.K. (2009). Recent cone species database. September 4th 2009 Edition
  • Tucker J.K. & Tenorio M.J. (2009) Systematic classification of Recent and fossil conoidean gastropods. Hackenheim: Conchbooks. 296 pp.
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