Overview

Distribution

Range Description

This is a wide ranging species which can be found in the Indian Ocean from Mozambique north to Somalia, Mascarenes, Maldives and Indonesia; In the Pacific it occurs from Japan to W. Australia and Queensland and east to Fiji and Samoa (Rockel et al. 1995).
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Ecology

Habitat

Habitat and Ecology

Habitat and Ecology
This species occurs at depths of 1 m to 30 m on intertidal benches, dead coral, rocks, rough reef limestone, and sand (Kohn and Nybakken 1975, Shu-Chuan and Shyh-Min 2004) and feeds on a variety of eunicid and nereid worms (Duda and Kohn 2005). It is a warmer water species (G. Raybaudi pers. comm. October 2011).

The typical adult size for shells of this species is between 25 - 47 mm in length ( Röckel et al. 1995).

Systems
  • Marine
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Depth range based on 1 specimen in 2 taxa.

Environmental ranges
  Depth range (m): 15 - 15
 
Note: this information has not been validated. Check this *note*. Your feedback is most welcome.

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Conservation

Conservation Status

IUCN Red List Assessment


Red List Category
LC
Least Concern

Red List Criteria

Version
3.1

Year Assessed
2013

Assessor/s
Raybaudi-Massilia, G.

Reviewer/s
Veldsman, S.G. & Peters, H.

Contributor/s

Justification
This is a wide ranging species which can be found in the Indian Ocean from Mozambique north to Somalia, Mascarenes, Maldives and Indonesia; In the Pacific it occurs from Japan to W. Australia and Queensland and east to Fiji and Samoa. It lives in a variety of habitats. There are currently no known threats that may affect the global population of this species, so that it has been listed as Least Concern.
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Population

Population
There are no population data for this species in the literature.

Population Trend
Unknown
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Threats

Major Threats
There are no known material threats to this species across its large range. Localized threats of pollution etc. may occur but are unlikely to cause major decline in the global population.
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Management

Conservation Actions

Conservation Actions
There are no known conservation measures currently in place for this species.
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Wikipedia

Conus balteatus

Conus balteatus, common name the Mauritian cone, is a species of sea snail, a marine gastropod mollusk in the family Conidae, the cone snails and their allies.[3]

Like all species within the genus Conus, these snails are predatory and venomous. They are capable of "stinging" humans, therefore live ones should be handled carefully or not at all.

There is one subspecies : Conus balteatus pigmentatus A. Adams & Reeve, 1848

Contents

Description

The size of an adult shell varies between 13 mm and 33 mm. The shell is olive-brown or brown violaceous, with a more or less irregular white band below the middle, and another one below the tuberculated spire. The interior of the aperture is tinged with violet. [4]

Distribution

This species occurs in the Indian Ocean along the Mascarene Basin and in the Western Pacific Ocean.

References

  1. ^ Sowerby (II), G. B. Jr., 1833. The Conchological Illustrations
  2. ^ Adams, A., and Reeve, L. A., 1848. The Zoology of the Voyage of H.M.S. Samarang: Under the Command of Captain Sir Edward Belcher, C.B., F.R.A.S., F.G.S.. Mollusca, pt. 1
  3. ^ a b Conus balteatus G. B. Sowerby II, 1833.  Retrieved through: World Register of Marine Species on 16 July 2011.
  4. ^ George Washington Tryon, Manual of Conchology, vol. VI, p. 21; 1879
  • Drivas, J. & M. Jay (1988). Coquillages de La Réunion et de l'île Maurice
  • Filmer R.M. (2001). A Catalogue of Nomenclature and Taxonomy in the Living Conidae 1758 - 1998. Backhuys Publishers, Leiden. 388pp
  • Bozzetti L. (2008) Conus anosyensis (Gastropoda: Prosobranchia: Conidae) nuova specie dal Madagascar Sud-Orientale. Malacologia Mostra Mondiale 58: 15
  • Tucker J.K. (2009). Recent cone species database. September 4th 2009 Edition

Gallery

Below are several color forms and one subspecies:

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