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Overview

Distribution

National Distribution

United States

Origin: Exotic

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Barcode data: Salvia x superba

The following is a representative barcode sequence, the centroid of all available sequences for this species.


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Statistics of barcoding coverage: Salvia x superba

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 1
Specimens with Barcodes: 1
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Conservation

Conservation Status

National NatureServe Conservation Status

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: NNA - Not Applicable

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NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: GNR - Not Yet Ranked

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Wikipedia

Salvia virgata

Salvia virgata (wand sage, southern meadow sage) is a perennial plant that is native to Asia and southeastern Europe. It is considered a noxious weed in many parts of the world.[1]

S. virgata is sometimes included within Salvia pratensis. Flowers grow in whorls of 4-6 with a blue-violet corolla (rarely white) that is 1 to 2 centimetres (0.39 to 0.79 in) long. The ovate to oblong leaves are dull green on the top surface, with the underside covered with glands and think hairs.[2]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ "GRIN Taxonomy for Plants". United States Department of Agriculture. Retrieved 13 March 2012. 
  2. ^ DiTomaso, Joseph M.; Healy, Evelyn A. (2007). WEEDS OF CALIFORNIA AND OTHER WESTERN STATES, Volume 1 (in Weeds). ANR Publications. pp. 885–889. ISBN 9781879906693. 
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