Overview

Distribution

National Distribution

United States

Origin: Unknown/Undetermined

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Unknown/Undetermined

Confidence: Confident

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Global Range: New Mexico, Texas, northeastern Mexico. In Texas, the range extends "from near Brownsville to Eagle Pass, NE to the edge of the Hill Country near Camp Wood, and on W past the Devils River" (Powell and Weedin 2004). In Mexico, the range includes Nuevo León, Tamaulipas (Flora of North America Editorial Committee 2003), and part of Coahuila east of the Chihuahuan desert and the Sierra Madre Oriental (Powell and Weedin 2004).

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Range Description

This species is endemic to Mexico, where it occurs in the states of Coahuila, Durango, Nuevo León, San Luis Potosí, Tamaulipas and Zacatecas, and in the United States in New Mexico and Texas (Hernández et al. 2004). The species occurs at elevation of 10 to 2,150 m asl (Pilbeam and Bowdery 2005).
The northernmost distribution in Otero, New Mexico and El Paso, Texas is taken from Benson (1982) and has not been confirmed since.
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Physical Description

Morphology

Description

Stems erect, spheric to short cylindric, 10-63 × 7.5-30 cm; ribs 10-17, crenate or sharply notched to undulate or deeply sinuate, hence ribs prominent to poorly defined, or stem sometimes tuberculate. Spines 12-16(-28) per areole, pinkish brown and/or straw colored, often imparting appearance of dried grass clump, smallest spines per areole slender, sometimes bristlelike, less than 1 mm diam.; central spines 4(-8) per areole, terete to strongly flattened, apically curved or strongly hooked, very flexible, sometimes almost papery, smooth to weakly annulate, principal central spine (40-)60-165 × (0.5-)1-3 mm. Flowers yellow inside and out, 5.5-8(-10) × 6.5-9.5 cm; inner tepals bright lemon yellow, very glossy; stigma lobes pale yellow. Fruits indehiscent, green or maroon, 20-50 × 10-30 mm, thin walled, soft, juicy, locule filled with very juicy pulp and seeds. Seeds 1-1.6 mm, pitted.
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Diagnostic Description

Synonym

Echinocactus hamatacanthus Muehlenpfordt, Allg. Gartenzeitung 14: 371. 1846 (as hamatocanthus)
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Ecology

Habitat

Comments: In soils from igneous rock and on old river gravels in the desert and grasslands.

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Habitat and Ecology

Habitat and Ecology
The species grows in xerophyllous scrub, on a diversity of soils and on hills, in soils from igneous rock and on old river gravels in the desert and grasslands.

Systems
  • Terrestrial
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Population Biology

Number of Occurrences

Note: For many non-migratory species, occurrences are roughly equivalent to populations.

Estimated Number of Occurrences: 21 - 80

Comments: Seventy-five EO's (Benson 1982).

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General Ecology

The ecology of species in this genus make it likely that this specie will utilize favorable microhabitat in association with nurse plants.

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Life History and Behavior

Reproduction

All Ferocactus species produce fleshy-fruits which are consumed and dispersed by animals (Valiente-Banuet and Godinez-Alvarez 2002).

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Conservation

Conservation Status

National NatureServe Conservation Status

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: NNR - Unranked

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NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: G4 - Apparently Secure

Reasons: Widespread throughout New Mexico, Texas and northeastern Mexico.

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IUCN Red List Assessment


Red List Category
LC
Least Concern

Red List Criteria

Version
3.1

Year Assessed
2013

Assessor/s
Corral-Díaz, R., Goettsch, B.K., Gómez-Hinostrosa, C., Heil, K. & Terry, M.

Reviewer/s
Superina, M.

Contributor/s

Justification
Ferocactus hamatacanthus has a wide range and is abundant. Even though some subpopulations are affected by road construction and land use change, these are not a major threats to the species as a whole. Hence, this cactus is listed as Least Concern.
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Population

Population
The species is locally abundant.

Population Trend
Stable
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Threats

Comments: Most cacti subject to horticultural collecting.

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Major Threats
Land use change and road construction affect several subpopulations.
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Management

Conservation Actions

Conservation Actions
The species occurs in several protected areas, such as the Big Bend National Park in Texas (United States), Cuatro Cienégas in Coahuila and Cumbre de Monterrey in Nuevo León, Mexico.
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Wikipedia

Ferocactus hamatacanthus

Ferocactus hamatacanthus is a barrel cactus in the genus Ferocactus belonging to the family Cacteae.

Ferocactus hamatacanthus sinuatus HabitusFlowers Bln0906a.jpg

Distribution[edit]

Ferocactus hamatacanthus pm.JPG

Ferocactus hamatacanthus is widespread in the Chihuahuan Desert of Northern Mexico, New Mexico, and Southwestern Texas. The Ferocactus hamatacanthus Type Locality was found in Mexico.

Description[edit]

Ferocactus hamatacanthus forms to be solitary, usually a globular to oblong shape, and grows up to 60 centimetres (24 in). This plant contains 13 ribs normally, but can sometimes be around 17. These ribs of the cactus are strongly tubercled and are generally 2 centimetres (0.79 in) to 3 centimetres (1.2 in) high. Its aeroles are large and 1 centimetre (0.39 in) to 3 centimetres (1.2 in) apart. There are about 12 radial spines, 5 centimetres (2.0 in) to 7 centimetres (2.8 in) long, that are acicular and terete. However, there are fewer central spines, only 4, that tend to be angled and elongated at around 15 centimetres (5.9 in). One of the central spines is hooked at its apex as well.

This cactus' flowers are large, usually 7 centimetres (2.8 in) to 8 centimetres (3.1 in), and display a yellow color with an inner scarlet color in some forms. This cactus also produces a fruit that is oblong, 2 centimetres (0.79 in) to 5 centimetres (2.0 in) long, fleshy, edible, and a dark brown to drab-color (not red). In addition to these features, its seeds are pitted. [1]

Features[edit]

Ferocactus hamatacanthus develops elongated glands, usually 2 centimetres (0.79 in) to 4 centimetres (1.6 in), in the aeroles between the flower and the spines. At first, these glands are soft, but as they mature they become hard and spine-like. Another key feature is the difference of its fruit compared to other species. The fruit of this species is thin and the flesh is very juicy and edible, reminiscent of kiwis in flavor. [1]

The Cactaceae Vol III, plate XVI filtered.jpg

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b N. L. Britton, J. N. Rose (1922) (in German), The Cactaceae. Descriptions and Illustrations of Plants of the Cactus Family, Band III, Washington: The Carnegie Institution of Washington, pp. 145
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