Overview

Comprehensive Description

Description

This perennial plant is 1-2½' tall, branching occasionally to abundantly. The stems are light green, terete, and appressed-pubescent. The opposite leaves are up to 3" long and 2" across; they have short slender petioles. The leaf blades are oval-cordate, oval, or ovate in shape, while their margins are dentate or dentate-crenate. The upper blade surface is light green and glabrous with a conspicuous network of veins. The upper stems terminate in flat-topped clusters of flowerheads. Each cluster of flowerheads spans about 1-3" across. Each flowerhead has about 40-50 disk florets that are pink, lavender, or blue. Each floret has a tiny tubular corolla with 5 spreading lobes and a strongly exerted style that is divided into two filiform parts. Around the base of each flowerhead, there are several floral bracts (phyllaries) that are arranged in 1-2 series; they are light green and linear in shape. The branches underneath each flowerhead cluster are light green and terete. The blooming period occurs from mid-summer to early autumn, lasting about 1-2 months. There is no noticeable floral scent. Afterwards, the florets are replaced by achenes with small tufts of hair; they are distributed by the wind. The root system is highly rhizomatous; this plant readily forms colonies.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© John Hilty

Source: Illinois Wildflowers

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Comments

Mistflower has attractive delicate flowers that are colored in pastel shades of pink, lavender, or blue. For this reason, it is often grown in flower gardens. This plant is closely related to the white-flowered Bonesets (Eupatorium spp.), and sometimes it is still referred to as Eupatorium coelestinum. Mistflower can be distinguished from the Bonesets primarily by its colorful flowers, relatively short stature, and broad opposite leaves that are heavily veined. While species of Joe-Pye Weed (Eupatoriadelphus spp.) have similar colorful flowers, they are taller plants with whorled leaves. All of these species are similar in that their flowerheads consist entirely of disk florets. Return
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© John Hilty

Source: Illinois Wildflowers

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Description

Sunflower Family (Asteraceae). Mistflower is an erect (to 3 feet), rhizomatous perennial, often forming colonies. It is a U.S. native. The opposite leaves are oval-shaped, hairy, and have toothed edges. The small flower heads are clustered at the top of the plant. They are powder blue to violet and fluffy in appearance, similar to Ageratums used as garden bedding plants. The tiny seeds are black, elongated, and have long white hairs attached to one end.

Public Domain

USDA NRCS Jamie L. Whitten Plant Materials Center

Source: USDA NRCS PLANTS Database

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Alternative names

Eupatorium coelestinum L., wild ageratum

Public Domain

USDA NRCS Jamie L. Whitten Plant Materials Center

Source: USDA NRCS PLANTS Database

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Distribution

National Distribution

Canada

Origin: Exotic

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Unknown/Undetermined

Confidence: Confident

United States

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Localities documented in Tropicos sources

Eupatorium coelestinum fo. coelestinum :
United States (North America)

Note: This information is based on publications available through Tropicos and may not represent the entire distribution. Tropicos does not categorize distributions as native or non-native.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Localities documented in Tropicos sources

Conoclinium coelestinum (L.) DC.:
United States (North America)

Note: This information is based on publications available through Tropicos and may not represent the entire distribution. Tropicos does not categorize distributions as native or non-native.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Localities documented in Tropicos sources

Eupatorium coelestinum L.:
United States (North America)
China (Asia)

Note: This information is based on publications available through Tropicos and may not represent the entire distribution. Tropicos does not categorize distributions as native or non-native.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Distribution and adaptation

Mistflower is adapted to most soil types, but is especially suited to heavy textured and to highly organic soils. Natural stands are found on moist to wet sites, such as low woods, wet meadows, and ditches. It grows best in full sun, but will tolerate light shade.

Blue mistflower is distributed throughout the eastern and midwest United States. For a current distribution map, please consult the Plant Profile page for this species on the PLANTS Website.

Public Domain

USDA NRCS Jamie L. Whitten Plant Materials Center

Source: USDA NRCS PLANTS Database

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Physical Description

Morphology

Description

Stems usually erect, sometimes decumbent or procumbent (rooting at nodes). Leaf blades triangular to deltate or ovate, 2–7(–13) cm, bases usually cuneate to truncate, rarely subcordate, margins serrate to serrate-dentate or crenate, apices acute. Phyllaries 3.5–4 mm. Corollas blue to blue-violet or rosy-violet, (1.6–)2–2.5 mm. Cypselae 1–1.5 mm, glabrous; pappi: bristle tips not dilated. 2n = 20.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Diagnostic Description

Synonym

Eupatorium coelestinum Linnaeus, Sp. Pl. 2: 838. 1753; Conoclinium dichotomum Chapman
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Type Information

Isotype for Eupatorium coelestinum f. illinoense Benke
Catalog Number: US 1571117
Collection: Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany
Preparation: Pressed specimen
Collector(s): H. Benke
Year Collected: 1931
Locality: Creal Springs., Williamson, Illinois, United States, North America
  • Isotype: Benke, H. C. 1933. Rhodora. 35: 46.
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany

Source: National Museum of Natural History Collections

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Ecology

Dispersal

Establishment

A clean, firm seedbed is essential. The site should be treated with a herbicide to control existing vegetation, tilled, cultipacked once or twice, and allowed to settle thoroughly before sowing. Broadcast ½ to ¾ gram seed per 100 square feet (½ to ¾ lb/acre). Bulk sowing rates usually need to be increased to allow for low purity values. The seed can be mixed with sand or rice hulls to increase volume so that it will be easier to spread uniformly over the planting site. Seed must remain on the soil surface because they are easily smothered when buried in the soil. The seed will not germinate until the following spring, but will benefit from the cool, moist winter environment.

Public Domain

USDA NRCS Jamie L. Whitten Plant Materials Center

Source: USDA NRCS PLANTS Database

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Associations

Flower-Visiting Insects of Mistflower in Illinois

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Faunal Associations

The flowers attract long-tongued bees, butterflies, and skippers. Other occasional visitors include short-tongued bees, various flies, moths, and beetles. These insects seek nectar primarily, although the bees often collect pollen. Insects that feed on Eupatorium spp. (Bonesets) may also feed on Mistflower. Insect feeders of this group of plants include the caterpillars of such moths as Haploa clymene (Clymene Moth; eats foliage), Phragmatobia lineata (Lined Ruby Tiger Moth; eats foliage), Carmenta bassiformis (Eupatorium Borer Moth; bores into roots), and Schinia trifascia (Three-Lined Flower Moth; eats florets & developing seeds). Mammalian herbivores rarely consume Mistflower because of its bitter foliage. Photographic Location
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© John Hilty

Source: Illinois Wildflowers

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Barcode data: Conoclinium coelestinum

The following is a representative barcode sequence, the centroid of all available sequences for this species.


Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© Barcode of Life Data Systems

Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Statistics of barcoding coverage: Conoclinium coelestinum

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 2
Specimens with Barcodes: 12
Species With Barcodes: 1
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© Barcode of Life Data Systems

Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Conservation

Conservation Status

NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: G5 - Secure

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

National NatureServe Conservation Status

Canada

Rounded National Status Rank: NNA - Not Applicable

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: N5 - Secure

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Status

Please consult the PLANTS Web site and your State Department of Natural Resources for this plant’s current status (e.g. threatened or endangered species, state noxious status, and wetland indicator values).

Public Domain

USDA NRCS Jamie L. Whitten Plant Materials Center

Source: USDA NRCS PLANTS Database

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Management

Control

Please contact your local agricultural extension specialist or county weed specialist to learn what works best in your area and how to use it safely. Always read label and safety instructions for each control method. Trade names and control measures appear in this document only to provide specific information. USDA, NRCS does not guarantee or warranty the products and control methods named, and other products may be equally effective.

Public Domain

USDA NRCS Jamie L. Whitten Plant Materials Center

Source: USDA NRCS PLANTS Database

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Apply fertilizer according to soil test recommendations. If not available, a rate of 3½ to 5½ oz/100 square feet (100 to 150 lbs/acre) of 13-13-13 should be applied after the seedlings are established and annually thereafter. Stands can be mowed in the spring and early summer. Later mowings should be delayed until the plants have set seed.

Public Domain

USDA NRCS Jamie L. Whitten Plant Materials Center

Source: USDA NRCS PLANTS Database

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Weediness

This plant may become weedy or invasive in some regions or habitats and may displace desirable vegetation if not properly managed. Please consult with your local NRCS Field Office, Cooperative Extension Service office, or state natural resource or agriculture department regarding its status and use. Weed information is also available from the PLANTS Web site at plants.usda.gov.

Public Domain

USDA NRCS Jamie L. Whitten Plant Materials Center

Source: USDA NRCS PLANTS Database

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Relevance to Humans and Ecosystems

Benefits

Cultivation

The preference is full sun to light shade, moist conditions, and soil containing loam or silt. There should be sufficient organic material in the soil to retain moisture. This plant can spread aggressively in moist open ground, otherwise it presents few problems. Drought tolerance is poor. Propagation is by seed or division of the rhizomes. Range & Distribution
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© John Hilty

Source: Illinois Wildflowers

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Uses

This plant is used mainly for landscape beautification. It has potential for use in cultivated, garden situations, in naturalized prairie or meadow plantings, and along roadsides.

Public Domain

USDA NRCS Jamie L. Whitten Plant Materials Center

Source: USDA NRCS PLANTS Database

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Wikipedia

Conoclinium coelestinum

Conoclinium coelestinum, the blue mistflower, is a species of herbaceous perennial flowering plant in the family Asteraceae. It was formerly classified in the genus Eupatorium, but phylogenetic analyses in the late 20th century research indicated that that genus should be split, and the species was reclassified in Conoclinium.[1]

Description[edit]

C. coelestinum can reach a height of about 3 feet (0.91 m). It has opposite leaves, almost triangular-shaped. On the top this plant forms clusters of bright blue, violet or white flowers, about 1/4 inch long. It flowers from July to November.

Blue mistflower is often grown as a garden plant, although it does have a tendency to spread and take over a garden. It is recommended for habitat restoration within its native range, especially in wet soils.

Distribution[edit]

This species is native to eastern North America, from Ontario to Florida to Texas.

Habitat[edit]

This species prefers wood edges, sandy woodlands and clearings, wet meadows and stream banks.

References[edit]

Creative Commons Attribution Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-SA 3.0)

Source: Wikipedia

Unreviewed

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Names and Taxonomy

Taxonomy

Comments: Kartesz (1999) treats Eupatorium coelestinum (from Kartesz 1994) as Conoclinium coelestinum.

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Disclaimer

EOL content is automatically assembled from many different content providers. As a result, from time to time you may find pages on EOL that are confusing.

To request an improvement, please leave a comment on the page. Thank you!