Overview

Distribution

National Distribution

United States

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

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Localities documented in Tropicos sources

Dudleya cymosa subsp. setchellii (Jeps.) Moran:
United States (North America)

Note: This information is based on publications available through Tropicos and may not represent the entire distribution. Tropicos does not categorize distributions as native or non-native.
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Ecology

Habitat

Comments: Rocky outcrops within serpentine grasslands at 120-300 m elevation.

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Population Biology

Number of Occurrences

Note: For many non-migratory species, occurrences are roughly equivalent to populations.

Estimated Number of Occurrences: 21 - 80

Comments: 48 total occurrences; 44 non-historical

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Conservation

Conservation Status

National NatureServe Conservation Status

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: N2 - Imperiled

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NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: G2 - Imperiled

Reasons: Endemic to a limited habitat in Santa Clara County, California. There are 44 known sites. A large part of the largest population (with about 20,000 plants) is threatened by residential and golf course development. Development threatens several other populations to varying degrees. One population is threatened by off-road motorcycle traffic and illegal dumping.

Environmental Specificity: Very narrow. Specialist or community with key requirements scarce.

Comments: Serpentine rock endemic.

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Global Short Term Trend: Decline of 30-50%

Global Long Term Trend: Decline of 50-70%

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Threats

Degree of Threat: Very high

Comments: A major threat is development - many occurrences are known to be on private land and most are under some threat of development, both residential and recreational (such as a proposed golf course) (USFWS 1998). Secondary threats associated with development are introduced weedy species, road construction, trampling, and run-off from the proposed upslope golf course (USFWS 1998). Currently a landfill, quarry, and off-road motorcycle recreation area exist in the area and their activities and possible future expansion also pose a threat to this species (USFWS 1998). Other threats include grazing, unauthorized dumping, and over collection (USFWS 1998).

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Wikipedia

Dudleya setchellii

Dudleya setchellii, the Santa Clara Valley Dudleya, is a member of the Dudleya genus of succulent perennials, members of the family Crassulaceae. The Santa Clara Valley Dudleya, endemic to the Santa Clara Valley region in the southern San Francisco Bay Area, was listed on February 3, 1995, as an endangered species.

Contents

Description

The Dudleya setchellii plant blooms in the spring, with pale yellow flowers on vertical stems about a foot high.

Distribution

Dudleya setchellii is found only in the Coyote Valley area of southern Santa Clara County, California, mostly on rocky outcrops within serpentine grasslands on Tulare Hill and the Santa Teresa Hills west of Coyote Creek in south San Jose and south of Metcalf Canyon east of Coyote Creek.

References

  • Dudleya and Hassenthaus Handbook, Paul Thompson 1993, Bonsall Publications, 248 pp
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Names and Taxonomy

Taxonomy

Comments: USFWS (1993) and Kartesz (1999) treat at the species level as Dudleya setchellii; these plants have also been treated as D. cymosa ssp. setchellii (as by Kartesz, 1994) and D. abramsii ssp. setchellii (as by Baldwin et al. 2012).

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