Overview

Comprehensive Description

Comments

Notwithstanding its common name, this plant doesn't cause sneezing or hay fever during the autumn – its pollen is distributed by insects, rather than the wind. Common Sneezeweed blooms quite late in the year, providing some fall color when other plants have finished blooming. A similar species, Helenium flexuosum (Purple-Headed Sneezeweed), differs from Common Sneezeweed by having disk florets that are purple, rather than yellow, and its foliage is more soft-hairy. This latter species is native to southern Illinois. Return
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© John Hilty

Source: Illinois Wildflowers

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Description

This perennial plant is 3-5' tall, branching sparingly to occasionally. It has greenish stems that are angular and winged. The alternate leaves are up to 5" long and 1½" across; they are lanceolate-oblong to elliptic-oblong in shape and slightly serrated along their margins. The leaves are either sessile or their bases clasp the stems. Upper stems terminate in flowerheads spanning about 1½-2" across; they are usually produced in abundance. Each flowerhead has a slightly flattened to globoid head of yellow disk florets that is surrounded by yellow ray florets. The petaloid rays of the latter florets are narrowly triangular in shape (broader at their tips than at their bases). The tips of these unusual rays are doubly notched, creating an interesting effect. The tubular corollas of the tiny disk florets are less than 1/8" across. The blooming period occurs during the autumn for 1-2 months. Afterwards, the florets are replaced by achenes that lack tufts of hair; they are distributed in part by water. The root system is shallow and fibrous. Cultivation
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© John Hilty

Source: Illinois Wildflowers

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Distribution

National Distribution

Canada

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

United States

Origin: Unknown/Undetermined

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Unknown/Undetermined

Confidence: Confident

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

National Distribution

Canada

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

United States

Origin: Unknown/Undetermined

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Unknown/Undetermined

Confidence: Confident

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Range and Habitat in Illinois

The native Common Sneezeweed occurs throughout Illinois, where it is quite common in the central and northern sections of the state (see Distribution Map). In southern Illinois, this plant is less common or absent. Habitats include moist black soil prairies, moist meadows in wooded areas, moist meadows along rivers, moist open woodlands, soggy thickets, fens, marshes, poorly drained pastures and abandoned fields, low areas along streams and ponds, and ditches. It is not uncommon to find this plant growing within a few feet of water in both disturbed areas and higher quality habitats. Recovery from fire is poor. Faunal Associations
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© John Hilty

Source: Illinois Wildflowers

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

National Distribution

Canada

Origin: Unknown/Undetermined

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Unknown/Undetermined

Confidence: Confident

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

National Distribution

Canada

Origin: Unknown/Undetermined

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Unknown/Undetermined

Confidence: Confident

United States

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

National Distribution

Canada

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

United States

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Physical Description

Morphology

Description

Perennials, 50–130 cm. Stems 1(–7), branched distally, strongly winged, sparsely to densely hairy proximally, moderately to densely hairy distally. Leaves usually moderately to densely hairy, sometimes glabrous; basal blades (withered by flowering) lanceolate, oblanceolate, or obovate, entire or weakly lobed; proximal and mid blades obovate to oblanceolate, usually dentate or entire; distal blades oblanceolate to lanceolate, entire or dentate. Heads 5–70(–100+) per plant, in paniculiform arrays. Peduncles 3–10 cm, moderately to densely hairy. Involucres globoid, 8–20 × 8–23 mm. Phyllaries (connate proximally) moderately to densely hairy. Ray florets 8–21, pistillate, fertile; corollas yellow, 10–23 × 4–10 mm. Disc florets 200–400(–800+); corollas yellow proximally, yellow to yellow-brown distally, 2.4–4 mm, lobes 5. Cypselae 1–2 mm, sparsely to moderately hairy; pappi of 5–7 entire, aristate scales (0.5–)0.9–1.5(–1.8) mm. 2n = 32, 34, 36.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Diagnostic Description

Synonym

Helenium autumnale var. canaliculatum (Lamarck) Torrey & A. Gray; H. autumnale var. fylesii B. Boivin; H. autumnale var. grandiflorum Torrey & A. Gray; H. autumnale var. montanum (Nuttall) Fernald; H. autumnale var. parviflorum (Nuttall) Fernald; H. latifolium Miller; H. parviflorum Nuttall
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Ecology

Habitat

Range and Habitat in Illinois

The native Common Sneezeweed occurs throughout Illinois, where it is quite common in the central and northern sections of the state (see Distribution Map). In southern Illinois, this plant is less common or absent. Habitats include moist black soil prairies, moist meadows in wooded areas, moist meadows along rivers, moist open woodlands, soggy thickets, fens, marshes, poorly drained pastures and abandoned fields, low areas along streams and ponds, and ditches. It is not uncommon to find this plant growing within a few feet of water in both disturbed areas and higher quality habitats. Recovery from fire is poor. Faunal Associations
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© John Hilty

Source: Illinois Wildflowers

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Associations

Flower-Visiting Insects of Sneezeweed in Illinois

Helenium autumnale (Sneezeweed)
(Bees collect pollen or suck nectar; beetles and flies suck nectar or feed on pollen; other insects suck nectar; some observations are from Robertson, otherwise they are from Graenicher, Moure & Hurd, and LaBerge as indicated below)

Bees (long-tongued)
Apidae (Apinae): Apis mellifera sn cp (Rb, Gr); Apidae (Bombini): Bombus centralis sn cp (Gr), Bombus fraternus sn, Bombus griseocallis sn (Rb, Gr), Bombus impatiens sn fq, Bombus pensylvanica sn fq (Rb, Gr), Bombus vagans sn cp (Gr), Psithyrus citrinus sn (Gr); Anthophoridae (Ceratinini): Ceratina dupla dupla sn cp (Gr); Anthophoridae (Epeolini): Triepeolus cressonii cressonii sn fq, Triepeolus helianthi helianthi sn (Gr); Anthophoridae (Eucerini): Melissodes agilis sn (Rb, Gr), Melissodes bimaculata bimaculata (LB), Melissodes boltoniae sn cp fq, Melissodes rustica sn cp, Melissodes trinodis sn cp, Svastra obliqua obliqua sn; Anthophoridae (Xylocopini): Xylocopa virginica sn cp (Gr); Megachilidae (Coelioxini): Coelioxys modesta sn (Gr), Coelioxys octodentata sn, Coelioxys rufitarsis rufitarsis sn (Gr); Megachilidae (Megachilini): Megachile brevis brevis sn cp fq, Megachile centuncularis sn cp (Gr), Megachile latimanus sn cp (Rb, Gr), Megachile mendica sn cp

Bees (short-tongued)
Halictidae (Halictinae): Agapostemon sericea sn (Gr), Agapostemon virescens sn (Rb, Gr), Augochlorella striata sn (Gr), Halictus confusus sn cp (Rb, Gr), Halictus ligatus sn (Gr), Halictus sp. (Lasioglossum sp.) sn (Gr), Lasioglossum coriaceus sn (Gr), Lasioglossum zephyrus sn cp (Gr); Halictidae (Nomiinae): Nomia nortoni nortoni (MH); Colletidae (Colletinae): Colletes compactus sn cp; Andrenidae (Andreninae): Andrena chromotricha sn (Gr)

Wasps
Sphecidae (Bembicinae): Bembix americana (Rb, Gr), Bicyrtes ventralis (Rb, Gr) fq; Sphecidae (Sphecinae): Ammophila nigricans, Ammophila procera, Isodontia philadelphica (Gr), Prionyx atrata; Vespidae: Polistes fuscata, Vespula germanica

Flies
Syrphidae: Dasysyrphus venustus sn, Epistrophe emarginata (Gr), Eristalis tenax (Gr), Eristalis transversus (Gr), Syritta pipiens (Gr); Bombyliidae: Poecilanthrax alcyon sn (Rb, Gr), Sparnopolius confusus sn (Rb, Gr); Anthomyiidae: Delia platura (Gr); Calliphoridae: Cochliomyia macellaria (Gr), Lucilia sericata (Gr); Muscidae: Stomoxys calcitrans (Gr); Tachinidae: Archytas analis (Gr)

Butterflies
Nymphalidae: Phyciodes tharos; Pieridae: Colias philodice, Pieris rapae (Gr); Lycaenidae: Lycaena hyllus (Gr)

Skippers
Hesperiidae: Polites themistocles (Rb, Gr)

Moths
Ctenuchidae: Cisseps fulvicollis

Beetles
Cantharidae: Chauliognathus pennsylvanicus sn fq; Chrysomelidae: Diabrotica undecimpunctata fp (Gr); Meloidae: Epicauta pensylvanica fp np

Plant Bugs
Miridae: Lygus lineolaris (Gr), Plagiognathus sp. (Gr); Pentatomidae: Euschistus serva, Euschistus variolaria (Gr)

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Barcode data: Helenium autumnale

The following is a representative barcode sequence, the centroid of all available sequences for this species.


Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© Barcode of Life Data Systems

Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Statistics of barcoding coverage: Helenium autumnale

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 2
Specimens with Barcodes: 16
Species With Barcodes: 1
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© Barcode of Life Data Systems

Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Conservation

Conservation Status

National NatureServe Conservation Status

Canada

Rounded National Status Rank: N5 - Secure

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: NNR - Unranked

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

National NatureServe Conservation Status

Canada

Rounded National Status Rank: N2 - Imperiled

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: NNR - Unranked

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: T5 - Secure

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: T4 - Apparently Secure

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

National NatureServe Conservation Status

Canada

Rounded National Status Rank: NNR - Unranked

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: TNR - Not Yet Ranked

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

National NatureServe Conservation Status

Canada

Rounded National Status Rank: NNR - Unranked

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: N5 - Secure

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: T5 - Secure

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

National NatureServe Conservation Status

Canada

Rounded National Status Rank: N5 - Secure

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: N5 - Secure

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: G5 - Secure

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Wikipedia

Helenium autumnale

Helenium autumnale is a flowering plant native to North America. Common names include common sneezeweed and large-flowered sneezeweed.[1][2][3]

Natural habitat and distribution[edit]

This plant is found throughout the contiguous mainland United States and most of Canada.[4]

Appearance[edit]

Common sneezeweed grows up to a meter tall. In late summer and fall, it bears daisylike flower heads with notched, recurved ray florets.

Cultivation[edit]

Common sneezeweed is cultivated as a garden perennial. There are multiple named varieties varying in color and height. 'Pumilum Magnificum' is a yellow variety about two feet tall. 'Bruno', a reddish brown cultivar, 'Kupfersprudel', which is yellow/orange, and 'Butterpat', which is golden, all grow 3 to 3.5 feet tall. 'Chippersfield Orange' is up to 4 feet tall and is orange streaked with gold.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Wilkinson, Kathleen (1999), Wildflowers of Alberta A Guideto Common Wildflowers and Other Herbaceous Plants, Edmonton, Alberta: Lone Pine Publishing and University of Alberta, p. 112, ISBN 0-88864-298-9 
  2. ^ Peterson, Roger T.; McKenny, Margaret (1968), A Field Guide to Wildflowers of Northeastern and North-Central North America (9th ed.), Boston: Houghton Mifflin, ISBN 0-395-91172-9 
  3. ^ Vance, F R; J.R. Rowsey, J.S Maclean and F.A. Switzer (1999), Wildflowers across the prairies With a new section on Grasses, sedges and rushes, Vancouver, British Columbia: Western Producer Prairie Books, p. 299, ISBN 1-55054-703-8 
  4. ^ USDA, PLANTS profile for Helenium autumnale (common sneezeweed), retrieved 2007-05-08 
Creative Commons Attribution Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-SA 3.0)

Source: Wikipedia

Unreviewed

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Disclaimer

EOL content is automatically assembled from many different content providers. As a result, from time to time you may find pages on EOL that are confusing.

To request an improvement, please leave a comment on the page. Thank you!