Overview

Distribution

National Distribution

United States

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

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Localities documented in Tropicos sources

Eupatorium rotundifolium L.:
United States (North America)

Note: This information is based on publications available through Tropicos and may not represent the entire distribution. Tropicos does not categorize distributions as native or non-native.
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Physical Description

Morphology

Description

Perennials, 40–100+ cm. Stems (from short rhizomes) single, sparsely branched distally, puber-ulent. Leaves usually opposite (distal sometimes alternate, lateral buds dormant or producing 1 pair of leaves); sessile or subsessile; blades ± 3-nerved, usually ± deltate to orbiculate, sometimes ovate, 15–50(–70) × 15–40(–60) mm (lengths mostly 1–2 times widths), bases broadly rounded to truncate, margins crenate to serrate, apices acute, faces puberulent to villous, gland-dotted. Heads in corymbiform arrays. Phyllaries 8–10 in 2–3 series, elliptic to oblanceolate, 2–6 × 0.5–1.5 mm, apices acute, abaxial faces puberulent, gland-dotted. Florets 5; corollas 3–4 mm. Cypselae 2–3 mm; pappi of 30–40 bristles 3.5–4 mm.
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Conservation

Conservation Status

NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: G5 - Secure

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National NatureServe Conservation Status

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: N5 - Secure

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Wikipedia

Eupatorium rotundifolium

Eupatorium rotundifolium, commonly called Roundleaf thoroughwort, is a herbaceous perennial plant in Asteraceae native to the eastern states of the United States in an area from New Jersey to Oklahoma south to Texas to Florida.[2] The stems grow from 40 to over 100 cm tall and are produced from short rhizomes. The inflorescences are composed of a large number of white flower heads with disc florets and no ray florets. Plants can be highly variable due to hybridization, three varieties have been named also.[3]

Hybrids and related species[edit]

As is common in Eupatorium, E. rotundifolium can form hybrids with other species in the genus. In particular, Eupatorium godfreyanum is a hybrid of E. rotundifolium and Eupatorium sessilifolium.[4]

The plants known as Eupatorium rotundifolium var. saundersii have often been treated as a variety of E. rotundifolium. They can be distinguished based on morphology,[5] and molecular evidence also suggests that these plants may be different enough from E. rotundifolium to recognize them as a species, Eupatorium pilosum.[4]

Chemical constituents[edit]

E. rotundifolium contains sesquiterpene lactones of the guaianolide type including euparotin acetate and eupachlorin acetate, both of which inhibit tumor growth in vitro when isolated from the plant.[6][7]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Eupatorium rotundifolium". NatureServe Explorer. NatureServe. Retrieved 2010-09-12. 
  2. ^ "Eupatorium rotundifolium Literature-based distribution". Tropicos.org. Missouri Botanical Garden. Retrieved 2013-06-28. 
  3. ^ "Eupatorium". Flora of North America. 
  4. ^ a b Kunsiri Chaw Siripun and Edward E. Schilling (2006). "Molecular confirmation of the hybrid origin of Eupatorium godfreyanum (Asteraceae)". American Journal of Botany 93 (2): 319–325. doi:10.3732/ajb.93.2.319. PMID 21646192. 
  5. ^ "18. Eupatorium pilosum Walter". 
  6. ^ Kupchan SM, Kelsey JE, Maruyama M, Cassady JM. (June 1968). "Eupachlorin acetate, a novel chloro-sesquiterpenoid lactone tumor inhibitor from Eupatorium rotundifolium". Tetrahedron Lett. 31 (31): 3517–3520. doi:10.1016/S0040-4039(01)99098-7. PMID 5649802. 
  7. ^ Kupchan SM, Hemingway JC, Cassady JM, Knox JR, McPhail AT, Sim GA. (18 January 1967). "The isolation and structural elucidation of euparotin acetate, a novel guaianolide tumor inhibitor from Eupatorium rotundifolium". J Am Chem Soc. 89 (2): 465–466. doi:10.1021/ja00978a061. PMID 6031638. 


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Notes

Comments

Eupatorium rotundifolium is one of the more variable species of the genus; its apparent propensity to hybridize with other species has led it to be described as a compilospecies and has complicated its delimitation. Hybrids with E. perfoliatum and E. sessilifolium are sufficiently distinctive to be treated here as distinctive entities (E. ×cordigerum and E. godfreyanum, respectively), and the varieties ovatum and scabridum have also been proposed to be of hybrid origin. The boundaries between varieties are indistinct and individual specimens may be difficult to place with confidence.
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