Overview

Distribution

Range Description

This species occurs off the Pacific coast of Baja California, Mexico, to northern Peru. It is also found in the Galapagos Islands, Revillagigedo Islands, Clipperton Island and Cocos Islands (Tenorio et al. 2012).
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Ecology

Habitat

Habitat and Ecology

Habitat and Ecology
This species occurs on rocky areas sometimes covered in algae at depths between 0 and 5 m (Tenorio et al. 2012). Typical size for shells of this species is approximately 43 mm in length (Paredes et al. 2010).

Systems
  • Marine
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Conservation

Conservation Status

IUCN Red List Assessment


Red List Category
LC
Least Concern

Red List Criteria

Version
3.1

Year Assessed
2013

Assessor/s
Tenorio, M.J.

Reviewer/s
Coltro, J., Peters, H. & Petuch, E.

Contributor/s

Justification
This species occurs off the Pacific coast of Baja California, Mexico, to northern Peru. It is also found in the Galapagos Islands, Revillagigedo Islands, Clipperton Island and Cocos Islands (Tenorio et al. 2012). This species is wide ranging and has no known threats. This species is listed as Least Concern.
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Population

Population
There are no population data available in the literature for this species. This is a very common species.

Population Trend
Unknown
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Threats

Major Threats
There are no known threats to this species.
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Management

Conservation Actions

Conservation Actions
There are no known conservation measures currently in place for this species.
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Wikipedia

Conus gladiator

Conus gladiator, common name the gladiator cone, is a species of sea snail, a marine gastropod mollusk in the family Conidae, the cone snails and their allies.[2]

Like all species within the genus Conus, these snails are predatory and venomous. They are capable of "stinging" humans, therefore live ones should be handled carefully or not at all.

Description[edit]

The size of an adult shell varies between 26 mm and 48 mm. The spire is rather depressed, tuberculate and striate. The color of the shell is chocolate-brown, variegated with white, disposed in longitudinal streaks, with an irregular white band, and more or less distinct revolving lines of darker brown. The interior is white or tinged with chocolate. The epidermis is fibrous.[3]

Distribution[edit]

This species occurs in the Pacific Ocean along the Galapagos Islands and from the Sea of Cortez to Peru.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Broderip, W. J., and Sowerby (i), G. B. Sr., 1833. Genus Conus. Proceedings of the Zoological Society of London, 1833: 52 -55
  2. ^ a b Conus gladiator Broderip, 1833.  Retrieved through: World Register of Marine Species on 24 July 2011.
  3. ^ George Washington Tryon, Manual of Conchology vol. VI, p. 28-29; 1879
  • Filmer R.M. (2001). A Catalogue of Nomenclature and Taxonomy in the Living Conidae 1758 - 1998. Backhuys Publishers, Leiden. 388pp.
  • Tucker J.K. (2009). Recent cone species database. 4 September 2009 Edition
  • Tucker J.K. & Tenorio M.J. (2009) Systematic classification of Recent and fossil conoidean gastropods. Hackenheim: Conchbooks. 296 pp
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