Overview

Distribution

Also distributed in Marshall Islands, Gilbert Islands, Tuamotus, Guam, Seleo Island, New Caledonia (Clark, 1954); bay of Bengal, East Indies, north Australia, Philippine, China, south Japan, South Pacific Is. And Hawaiian Is. (Clark & Rowe, 1971); Australia (Rowe & Gates, 1995), Lakshadweep (India)(Sastry, 1991). General distribution: tropical, east Indo-Pacific Ocean, depth range 0-30 m. (Rowe & Gates, 1995); from Lakshadweep (India) to Hawaiian Islands (Sastry, 1991). Ecology: benthic, inshore (Rowe & Gates, 1995).
  • Rowe, F.W.E & Gates, J. (1995). Echinodermata. In ‘Zoological Catalogue of Australia’. 33 (Ed A. Wells.) pp xiii + 510 (CSIRO Australia, Melbourne.)
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© WoRMS for SMEBD

Source: World Register of Marine Species

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Ecology

Habitat

Depth range based on 123 specimens in 5 taxa.
Water temperature and chemistry ranges based on 111 samples.

Environmental ranges
  Depth range (m): 1 - 68.5827
  Temperature range (°C): 23.980 - 28.954
  Nitrate (umol/L): 0.033 - 2.103
  Salinity (PPS): 34.131 - 36.142
  Oxygen (ml/l): 4.135 - 4.932
  Phosphate (umol/l): 0.081 - 0.301
  Silicate (umol/l): 0.667 - 6.713

Graphical representation

Depth range (m): 1 - 68.5827

Temperature range (°C): 23.980 - 28.954

Nitrate (umol/L): 0.033 - 2.103

Salinity (PPS): 34.131 - 36.142

Oxygen (ml/l): 4.135 - 4.932

Phosphate (umol/l): 0.081 - 0.301

Silicate (umol/l): 0.667 - 6.713
 
Note: this information has not been validated. Check this *note*. Your feedback is most welcome.

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Life History and Behavior

Growth

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Supplier: Katja Schulz

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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage: Culcita novaeguineae

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 0
Specimens with Barcodes: 3
Species With Barcodes: 1
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© Barcode of Life Data Systems

Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

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Genomic DNA is available from 10 specimens with morphological vouchers housed at Florida Museum of Natural History
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© Ocean Genome Legacy

Source: Ocean Genome Resource

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Wikipedia

Culcita novaeguineae

Culcita novaeguineae (common name, cushion star) is a species of starfish. It has short arms and an inflated appearance and resembles a pentagonal pincushion. It is variable in colour and can be found in tropical warm waters in the Indo-Pacific.

Taxonomy[edit]

C. novaeguineae has numerous synonyms, at least in part because it has a "goniasterid" phase; the juveniles exhibit little resemblance to the mature form, and gradually change in morphology as they grow. A number of different "species" were described in the literature before they were found to be different developmental stages of the same species. Some were even considered to be in a different family, the Goniasteridae, rather than in the correct family, Oreasteridae.[2]

Description[edit]

A Cushion star in Apo Reef, Philippines.

A mature C. novaeguineae is pentagonal in shape with an inflated appearance and much-abbreviated arms. It can grow to a diameter of 30 cm (12 in). Rows of tube feet are on the underside, and it has a central mouth. The colour is very variable and includes a mottling with darker and lighter shades of fawn, brown, orange, yellow and green.[3] The armoured body wall is made of calcareous ossicles which are supported internally by pillars which buttress the ambulacra. The armouring contains pits into which the tube feet can be retracted. The body cavity is filled with water.[4] Small cushion stars are very different in appearance. They are star-shaped, with five short, broad arms and a low profile. As they grow, the inter-arm areas fill in and expand relative to the tube-feet areas, and the arms get shorter relative to the disc which becomes inflated and more massive.[2]

Distribution[edit]

C. novaeguineae is found in the Indian and Pacific Oceans. Its range extends from Madagascar and the Seychelles to the Philippines, New Guinea (for which it is named), Australia and Hawaii.[1]

Biology[edit]

C. novaeguineae feeds on detritus and small invertebrates, including stony corals.[3] It can be kept in a reef aquarium of sufficient size stocked with suitable corals on which it can feed.[5]

Ecology[edit]

A number of organisms live in or on C. novaeguineae. The small shrimp Periclimenes soror lives as a commensal hiding under the cushion star.[3] Astroxynus culcitae, Stellicola oreastriphilus and Stellicola parvulipes are copepods which live parasitically on the outside of the cushion star.[1] The star pearlfish (Carapus mourlani) sometimes lives as a commensal inside the cushion star, working its way into the large body cavity through an ambulacral groove and emerging periodically to feed.[6]

Synonyms[edit]

  • Anthenea spinulosa (Gray, 1847)
  • Culcita grex Müller & Troschel, 1842
  • Culcita pentagularis Gray, 1847
  • Culcita pentangularis Gray, 1847
  • Culcita pulverulenta Perrier, 1869
  • Goniaster multiporum Hoffman in Rowe, 1974
  • Goniaster sebae (Muller & Troschel, 1842)
  • Goniodiscides sebae (Müller & Troschel, 1842)
  • Goniodiscus sebae Müller & Troschel, 1842
  • Hippasteria philippinensis Domantay & Roxas, 1938
  • Hosia spinulosa Gray, 1847
  • Pentagonaster spinulosus (Gray, 1847)
  • Randasia granulata Gray, 1847[1]

References[edit]

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Source: Wikipedia

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