Physical Description

Diagnostic Description

Description

Colour in life: background blue-green with deep blue markings, deep fawn with brown markings or pale fawn with purple markings, always paler adorally (Humphreys, 1981). Also distributed in Marshall Islands, Gilbert Islands Tuamotus, Canton Island, Saipan (Clark, 1954); SE Arabia, Persian Gulf, W India, Pakistan, Maldive area, Ceylon, East Indies, north Australia, Philippine, China south Japan, south Pacific Is. And Hawaiian Is. (Clark & Rowe, 1971); Australia (Rowe & Gates, 1995); Lakshadweep (India)(Sastry, 1991); Andaman Is. (Sastry, 1997). General distribution: circumtropical (Tortonese, 1980); tropical, Indo-Pacific Ocean, depth range 0-46 m. (Rowe & Gates (1995) and Kalk (1958)); East coast of africa to Hawaiian Islands (Sastry, 1991). Ecology: benthic, inshore, coral reefs (Rowe & Gates, 1995).
  • Rowe, F.W.E & Gates, J. (1995). Echinodermata. In ‘Zoological Catalogue of Australia’. 33 (Ed A. Wells.) pp xiii + 510 (CSIRO Australia, Melbourne.)
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© WoRMS for SMEBD

Source: World Register of Marine Species

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Ecology

Habitat

Depth range based on 1597 specimens in 1 taxon.
Water temperature and chemistry ranges based on 1574 samples.

Environmental ranges
  Depth range (m): 0.2 - 213.4
  Temperature range (°C): 19.793 - 28.954
  Nitrate (umol/L): 0.008 - 3.755
  Salinity (PPS): 33.032 - 37.646
  Oxygen (ml/l): 4.110 - 5.019
  Phosphate (umol/l): 0.063 - 0.555
  Silicate (umol/l): 0.869 - 4.870

Graphical representation

Depth range (m): 0.2 - 213.4

Temperature range (°C): 19.793 - 28.954

Nitrate (umol/L): 0.008 - 3.755

Salinity (PPS): 33.032 - 37.646

Oxygen (ml/l): 4.110 - 5.019

Phosphate (umol/l): 0.063 - 0.555

Silicate (umol/l): 0.869 - 4.870
 
Note: this information has not been validated. Check this *note*. Your feedback is most welcome.

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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Barcode data: Linckia multifora

The following is a representative barcode sequence, the centroid of all available sequences for this species.


There are 21 barcode sequences available from BOLD and GenBank.

Below is a sequence of the barcode region Cytochrome oxidase subunit 1 (COI or COX1) from a member of the species.

See the BOLD taxonomy browser for more complete information about this specimen and other sequences.

GTT---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------AACAAAATGAGCTTTTGACTTGTCCCCCCTTCATTCCTTCTACTTGTAGCCTCAGCTGGGGTAGAAAGAGGAGCTGGAACAGGATGAACTATTTACCCACCATTATCTAGTGGCCTCGCTCATGCTGGGGGATCAGTTGATCTTGCCATATTCTCGCTCCATCTGGCGGGTGCATCATCTATTCTAGCATCAATAAACTTTATTACCACCGTTATAAATATGCGTACGCCAGGAATTTCATTTGACCGGTTACCTCTGTTCGTATGATCAGTGTTCGTAACAGCCTTTCTCCTTCTTCTTTCCCTTCCAGTACTCGCTGGGGCAATAACAATGCTCCTAACGGATCGTAATGTCAACACAACTTTCTTCGACCCAGCTGGTGGTGGTGATCCTATCCTGTTCCAGCACTTATTCTGATTTTTTGGGCACCCGGAAGTATACATTCTTATCCTTCCAGGATTTGGAATGATATCCCATGTTATTGCGCACTACTCTGGGAAG---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------AGT
-- end --

Download FASTA File

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© Barcode of Life Data Systems

Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

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Statistics of barcoding coverage: Linckia multifora

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 21
Specimens with Barcodes: 53
Species With Barcodes: 1
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© Barcode of Life Data Systems

Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

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Genomic DNA is available from 29 specimens with morphological vouchers housed at Florida Museum of Natural History
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© Ocean Genome Legacy

Source: Ocean Genome Resource

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Wikipedia

Linckia multifora

Linckia multifora is a variously colored starfish in the family Ophidiasteridae that is found in the Indian Ocean and Red Sea. Its common names include the Dalmatian Linckia, mottled Linckia, spotted Linckia, multicolor sea star and multi-pore sea star.[2]

Description[edit]

Linckia multifora has a small disk and five long, slim cylindrical arms that taper slightly towards the tips. The colour is variable and includes brown, pink, red, or gray with small red spots. The surface has a rough texture and is covered in granulations.[2] This starfish can grow to a diameter of 2 to 5 inches (5 to 13 cm).[3]

Distribution[edit]

Linckia multifora is found in the Indian Ocean, including Aldabra, the Comoros, Kenya, Madagascar, the Mascarene Islands, Mauritius, Mozambique, the Red Sea, the Seychelles, Somalia, South Africa and Tanzania. It is found on the sea floor at depths down to about 130 feet (40 metres) and favors coral reefs.[4]

Biology[edit]

Linckia multifora exhibits autotomy (self amputation) and often sheds one or more arms. In this process, the arms become detached at various positions and each can grow into a new individual. This happens with such frequency that it is considered to be a means of asexual reproduction. Few individuals are found that do not exhibit some evidence of prior autotomy.[5][6]

In a study on Hawaii, it was found that the detachment of an arm is not caused by a sudden snap. Most fractures take place about 1 inch (2.5 cm) from the disk. A small crack appears on the lower surface which spreads to adjacent parts, then the tube feet on the arm and the body pull the two parts of the animal in opposite directions. The event may take about one hour to complete. The damaged tissues take about 10 days to heal and the animal grows a new arm over the course of several months. The detached arm is known as a "comet" and moves about independently. It takes about 10 months to regenerate a new disk with arms 0.5 inch (1 cm) in length. When arms were severed into several parts in the laboratory, it was found that those over 0.5 inch (1 cm) in length were capable of regenerating including the tips of the arms and central sections with multiple injuries. Occasionally aberrant individuals developed with the wrong number of arms or with limbs in the wrong place.[7]

Parasitic snails are sometimes found in or on the body of this starfish.[6] The snail Stylifer linckiae in the family Eulimidae has been shown to be a parasite by its uptake of materials from the seastar.[8]

Use in aquaria[edit]

Linckia multifora is an omnivore but the diet in aquaria mostly consists of the bacterial surface films and sponges which are usually present in established tanks. This species is more tolerant of varying levels of pH, salinity and temperature than other Linckias but needs careful acclimatization at the time of introduction.[9]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Linckia multifora (Lamarck, 1816) World Register of Marine Species. Retrieved 2011-09-24.
  2. ^ a b Seeing stars: Linckia multifora The Right Blue. Retrieved 2011-09-24.
  3. ^ Charpin, Florent (2010). "Mottled Linckia". Florent's Guide to the Tropical Reefs. Retrieved 26 September 2011. 
  4. ^ Linckia multifora Encyclopedia of Life. Retrieved 2011-09-24.
  5. ^ Rideout, R. S. (1978). "Asexual reproduction as a means of population maintenance in the coral reef asteroid Linckia multifora on Guam". Marine Biology 47 (3): 287–95. doi:10.1007/BF00541006. 
  6. ^ a b Education Department, Waikïkï Aquarium (2009). "MARINE LIFE PROFILE: LINCKIA SEASTAR". University of Hawai‘i-Mänoa. Retrieved 26 September 2011. 
  7. ^ Edmondson, Charles Howard (1935). "Autotomy and Regeneration in Hawaiian Starfishes". Bernice P. Bishop Museum - Occasional Papers 11 (8): 6–12. 
  8. ^ Tullis, Richard E.; Cheng, Thomas C. (1971). "The uptake of 14C by Stylifer linckiae (Mollusca: Prosobranchia) from its echinoderm host, Linckia multifora". Comparative Biochemistry and Physiology Part B: Comparative Biochemistry 40 (1): 109–10. doi:10.1016/0305-0491(71)90066-6. 
  9. ^ Dalmatian Linckia Starfish Blue Zoo Aquatics. Retrieved 2011-09-24.
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