Overview

Distribution

National Distribution

United States

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

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Calif.
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Physical Description

Morphology

Description

Shrubs , evergreen, (0.3-)0.5-2 m. Stems usually monomorphic, seldom with short axillary shoots. Bark of 2d-year stems brown or purple, glabrous. Bud scales 3-5 mm, deciduous. Spines absent. Leaves 5-7-foliolate; petioles 0.5-3 cm. Leaflet blades thick and rigid; surfaces abaxially dull, papillose, adaxially dull, glaucous; terminal leaflet stalked, rarely sessile in a few leaves, blades 2.2-8.8 × 1.8-6 cm, 1.2-2 times as long as wide; lateral leaflet blades elliptic to oblong or oblong-ovate, 1-3-veined from base, base obtuse or truncate, margins strongly crispate, toothed, each with 3-8 teeth 2-8 mm tipped with spines to 2-4.8 × 0.4-0.6 mm, apex rounded or obtuse. Inflorescences racemose, dense, 25-50-flowered, 3-7 cm; bracteoles membranous, apex rounded or obtuse. Flowers: anther filaments with distal pair of recurved lateral teeth. Berries dark blue, at least sometimes glaucous, oblong-ovoid, 6-7 mm, juicy, solid. 2 n = 28.
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Diagnostic Description

Synonym

Berberis aquifolium Pursh var. dictyota (Jepson) Jepson; B. californica Jepson; Mahonia dictyota (Jepson) Fedde
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Ecology

Habitat

Dry rocky places in chaparral and open woodland; 600-1800m.
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Life History and Behavior

Cyclicity

Flowering/Fruiting

Flowering winter-spring (Mar-Apr).
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Conservation

Conservation Status

National NatureServe Conservation Status

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: N4 - Apparently Secure

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NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: G4 - Apparently Secure

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Wikipedia

Berberis dictyota

Berberis dictyota is a plant species endemic to California but very widespread in that state, found from San Diego County to Siskiyou County.[3] It is generally found in open shrubby locations at elevations of 600–1800 m.[2]

Berberis dictyota is an evergreen shrub up to 2 m tall. Leaves are pinnate, with 5-7 leaflets; leaflets thick and rigid, whitish with a thick waxy layer on the underside, up to 9 cm long, with spines along the edges. Flowers are borne in dense racemes of up to 50 flowers. Berries are egg-shaped, dark blue, sometimes with a waxy coating, up to 7 mm long.[2][4][5][6][7][8]

References[edit]

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Notes

Comments

Berberis dictyota , B . amplectens , B . pumila , and B . wilcoxii are very similar, and the characters that separate them (height, glossiness and crispation of leaflets, and size and number of marginal teeth) are rather variable within the species. Berberis piperiana also belongs to this group, although it is usually more distinct because of its thinner leaflets with more slender, more numerous marginal spines. 

 Berberis dictyota is resistant to infection by Puccinia graminis .

Medicinally, the Kawaiisu used a decoction of the root of Berberis dictyota to treat gonorrhea (D. E. Moermann 1986).

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Names and Taxonomy

Taxonomy

Comments: Kartesz (1999 floristic synthesis) includes Mahonia californica here.

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