Overview

Distribution

National Distribution

United States

Origin: Unknown/Undetermined

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Unknown/Undetermined

Confidence: Confident

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Ariz., Calif., Colo., Nev., N.Mex, Tex.; Mexico (Sonora).
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Physical Description

Morphology

Description

Shrubs , evergreen, 1-4 m. Stems ± dimorphic, with elongate primary and short or somewhat elongate axillary shoots. Bark of 2d-year stems grayish purple, glabrous. Bud scales 2-4 mm, deciduous. Spines absent. Leaves 3-9-foliolate; petioles 0.1-0.5 cm. Leaflet blades thick and rigid; surfaces abaxially dull, papillose, adaxially dull, glaucous; terminal leaflet stalked in most leaves, blade 1.5-3.8 × 0.5-1.1 cm, 2-5 times as long as wide; lateral leaflet blades oblong-ovate to ovate or lanceolate, 1(-3)-veined from base, base acute to obtuse, rarely subtruncate, margins undulate or crispate, toothed or lobed, with 2-4 teeth 1-4 mm high tipped with spines to 1.2-2 × 0.2-0.3 mm, apex narrowly acute or acuminate. Inflorescences racemose, lax, 3-7-flowered, 1.5--4.5 cm; bracteoles membranous, apex acuminate. Flowers: anther filaments without distal pair of recurved lateral teeth. Berries purplish red, glaucous, spheric or short-ellipsoid, 5-8 mm, juicy, solid.
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Diagnostic Description

Synonym

Berberis nevinii A. Gray var. haematocarpa (Wooton) L. D. Benson; Mahonia haematocarpa (Wooton) Fedde
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Type Information

Type collection for Berberis haematocarpa Wooton
Catalog Number: US 330601
Collection: Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany
Verification Degree: Original publication and alleged type specimen examined
Preparation: Pressed specimen
Collector(s): E. O. Wooton
Year Collected: 1897
Locality: White Mountains, Mescalero Agency., Lincoln, New Mexico, United States, North America
Elevation (m): 1920 to 1920
  • Type collection: Wooton, E. O. 1898. Bull. Torrey Bot. Club. 25: 304.
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Type collection for Berberis haematocarpa Wooton
Catalog Number: US 735937
Collection: Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany
Verification Degree: Original publication and alleged type specimen examined
Preparation: Pressed specimen
Collector(s): E. O. Wooton
Year Collected: 1897
Locality: White Mountains., Lincoln, New Mexico, United States, North America
Elevation (m): 1920 to 1920
  • Type collection: Wooton, E. O. 1898. Bull. Torrey Bot. Club. 25: 304.
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Ecology

Habitat

Comments: In grasslands, on rocky slopes and canyons of mountains (Correll and Johnston, 1970).

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Slopes and flats in desert shrubland, desert grassland, and dry oak woodland; 900-2300m.
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Life History and Behavior

Cyclicity

Flowering/Fruiting

Flowering winter-spring (Feb-Jun).
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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage: Berberis haematocarpa

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 0
Specimens with Barcodes: 1
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Conservation

Conservation Status

National NatureServe Conservation Status

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: NNR - Unranked

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NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: G5 - Secure

Reasons: Common in the Trans-Pecos of Texas. Also in Arizona, New Mexico, and Mexico.

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Wikipedia

Berberis haematocarpa

Berberis haematocarpa Woot.[1] is a shrub up to 3 m tall, with common names including "red barberry," "Mexican barberry," and "Algerita." It is also sometimes called algerita,[2] but that name is more often applied to its relative, Mahonia trifoliolata.

Berberis haematocarpa is native to the southwestern United States and northern Mexico, where it grows in desert chaparral and woodlands, such as in the Mojave Desert of California. It is found on slopes and mesas in Arizona, New Mexico, Texas, Chihuahua and Sonora.

Berberis haematocarpa has thick, rigid pinnate leaves with 3-7 leaflets, whitish due to a thick cuticle of wax. Berries are red and spherical, up to 8 mm across. [3][4]


This is an erect evergreen shrub growing up to 4 meters (~12 ft.) tall. The leaves are several centimeters long and are each made up of a few thick, waxy, lance-shaped leaflets with spiny toothed edges.

The inflorescences bear 3 to 5 bright yellow flowers, each with nine sepals and six petals all arranged in whorls of three. The fruit is a juicy, edible yellow-orange or pink berry just under a centimeter wide.

The compound leaves place this species in the group sometimes segregated as the genus Mahonia.[4][5][6][7]


References[edit]

  1. ^ Wooton, Bulletin of the Torrey Botanical Club 25: 304. 1898.
  2. ^ Flora of North America
  3. ^ Laferriere, J.E. Berberidaceae, Barberry Family. Journal of the Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science 26:2-4. 1992.
  4. ^ a b Flora of North America vol 3.
  5. ^ Loconte, H., & J. R. Estes. 1989. Phylogenetic systematics of Berberidaceae and Ranunculales (Magnoliidae). Systematic Botany 14:565-579.
  6. ^ Marroquín, Jorge S., & Joseph E. Laferrière. 1997. Transfer of specific and infraspecific taxa from Mahonia to Berberis. Journal of the Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science 30(1):53-55.
  7. ^ Laferrière, Joseph E. 1997. Transfer of specific and infraspecific taxa from Mahonia to Berberis. Bot. Zhurn. 82(9):96-99.
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Mahonia haematocarpa

Mahonia haematocarpa (syn. Berberis haematocarpa) is a species of barberry known by the common name red barberry. It is also sometimes called algerita,[1] but that name is more often applied to its relative, Mahonia trifoliolata. It is native to the southwestern United States and northern Mexico, where it grows in desert chaparral and woodlands, such as in the Mojave Desert of California.

This is an erect evergreen shrub growing up to 4 meters (~12 ft.) tall. The leaves are several centimeters long and are each made up of a few thick, waxy, lance-shaped leaflets with spiny toothed edges.

The inflorescences bear 3 to 5 bright yellow flowers, each with nine sepals and six petals all arranged in whorls of three. The fruit is a juicy, edible yellow-orange or pink berry just under a centimeter wide.

References[edit]

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Notes

Comments

Typical populations of Berberis haematocarpa (with narrowly ovate or lanceolate leaflets and small, juicy, deep red berries) and B . fremontii (with ovate or orbiculate leaflets and large, dry, inflated, yellowish or brownish berries) are easily distinguished. These characteristics are not always well correlated, however, and intermediate populations, showing different combinations of leaflet shape and berry size, color, and inflation, are known. 

 Berberis haematocarpa is susceptible to infection by Puccinia graminis .

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